Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

Texas Child Protective Services funding gets final OK — with restrictions

Editor's note: This story has been updated with a statement from Sen. Jane Nelson. A board of lawmakers has given final approval for $150 million in funding to help pull the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services out of its crisis mode — but there are strings attached. In a letter dated Thursday, the Legislative Budget Board has given the agency the go-ahead to hire 829 new caseworkers and give $12,000 raises to existing ones. The funding includes $142.4 million in state dollars...
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Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Some long-time business owners on San Antonio’s West Side have lost a battle to get their old street name back. The San Antonio City Council voted not to restore the name Old Highway 90 to what is now called Enrique M. Barrera Parkway.  The council voted 10-0. A group of business owners and community members had formed as Save Old Highway 90 in hopes of getting back the name. Combined, they had raised the $32,000 required to pay for replacing road signs. Javier Gutierrez owns Del Bravo Records on the strip of road. He says the outcome is disappointing. “We’re licking our wounds.

Texas Child Protective Services funding gets final OK — with restrictions

10 hours ago
Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

 

Editor's note: This story has been updated with a statement from Sen. Jane Nelson.

A board of lawmakers has given final approval for $150 million in funding to help pull the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services out of its crisis mode — but there are strings attached. 

In a letter dated Thursday, the Legislative Budget Board has given the agency the go-ahead to hire 829 new caseworkers and give $12,000 raises to existing ones. The funding includes $142.4 million in state dollars and $7.6 million in federal money. 

James Goulden

An Austin-based choral group is planning their San Antonio Christmas performance.  The group is Conspirare, and their Art Director, Craig Hella Johnson, describes the group this way:

"A musical family of singers who come from all over the country. From New York and Minneapolis and Seattle and some small places in between, and certainly we have some in Austin also."

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Cameron County health officials say they want to wait until all of the test samples are in to disclose the test results on urine samples collected voluntarily by people in a southwest side Brownsville neighborhood.

A woman from that part of the city was diagnosed with Zika. She had not traveled anywhere or contracted the virus through sexual contact.

  

Commemorations are getting underway in Honolulu to mark next week’s 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Now, a new unnarrated documentary that premieres Sunday on the Smithsonian Channel aims to tell the story of the strike on Dec. 7, 1941, through film recordings and radio news reports — some that have rarely been seen or heard in decades.

Donald Trump kicked off his postelection "thank you tour" with a Thursday-night rally that sounded a lot like any of his campaign rallies. He said trade was dangerous, he warned about refugees, and his mention of his former opponent, Hillary Clinton, prompted supporters to chant "lock her up."

As was the case at many times on the campaign trail, Trump's presentation of facts requires some fact-checking and context. Here's a look at the president-elect's Thursday-night speech.

To say President-elect Donald Trump's incoming administration has public health and environmental advocates worried may be an understatement.  Like a lot of Republicans, Trump wants to roll back environmental protections and some people are already protesting his positions in the streets.

But, beyond protest, how will these groups push their agendas under the next administration? 

"I lost more than 80 percent of my university friends," recalls Jagannath Lamichhane.

After silently struggling with depression for two decades, Lamichhane published an essay in Nepal Times about his mental illness. "I could have hid my problem — like millions of people around the world," he says, but "if we hide our mental health, it may remain a problem forever."

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

On Fronteras:  Brownsville Zika Case, Police Diversity Training, Breaking Bread With Refugees

·         This week on Fronteras:   

·         A Brownsville woman contracts Zika locally - that steps up mosquito testing and killing.

·         Nine of 10 teachers report the election has had a negative effect on students.

·         How diversity training gives police vital cultural information for their encounters with Latinos, African Americans and immigrants.

·         The U.S. charter school model is going global in Pakistan to improve student achievement.

·         The powerful effect of breaking bread with refugees.

Unemployment dropped by 0.3 percentage points, to 4.6 percent, last month — the lowest rate since 2007 — according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Pages

Pottery Sale To Benefit TPR

Beautiful, practical bowls for the home by Dudley Harris

7 Stories, 7 Dollars

December 6 at the Josephine Theatre!

Third Annual Talent Contest

Open to area middle school and high school students

Arts & Culture

James Goulden

An Austin-based choral group is planning their San Antonio Christmas performance.  The group is Conspirare, and their Art Director, Craig Hella Johnson, describes the group this way:

"A musical family of singers who come from all over the country. From New York and Minneapolis and Seattle and some small places in between, and certainly we have some in Austin also."

Thanksgiving Redux: Three Scenes from Mexico

Dec 1, 2016
James Baker

Thank you, Mexico

I've seen a fair number of Thanksgivings pass in my day, almost all of them spent in Texas, with friends and family. It's by far my favorite holiday since it is truly about being thankful for family, friends, and good food. I don't take it for granted.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Two years ago, President Obama began softening U.S. relations with Cuba, and earlier this year, more travel restrictions were eased, allowing educational travel to the island nation which had been cut off from America for six decades. Matt Dunne, a professor at the University of Texas at San Antonio, saw an opportunity for him, and his students.

Katy Silva

The Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center's annual holiday event kicks off Friday.  It's called Hecho a Mano, a title that's an exacting description.

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