Ryan E. Poppe

One Year Later: Shaken And Torn, Wimberley Remains Strong

It’s been a year since Memorial Day weekend flood waters barreled down the Blanco River near Wimberley, sweeping away homes and killing 12 people. One year later, Wimberley residents are now better prepared for a major flood, but like shell-shocked soldiers, they still struggle with what happened. Wimberley homeowner Mack Stringfellow will never forget what he heard from his bedroom window, as the fast moving waters pushed aside the concrete and steel beams of the Fisher Store Bridge,...
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The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.

The suicide of a 16-year-old Alamo Heights ISD student in January has prompted San Antonio schools to look for ways they can give students the self-esteem they need to survive bullying. David Molak took his life after other students taunted him through social media. Louisa Jonas reports that this week, schools throughout San Antonio invited a motivational youth speaker to talk to their students about bullying, kindness, and tolerance.

A bereaved community will say goodbye to Father Eddie Bernal this week.

The well-known community and parish leader who urged his community to place equality, inclusion, and love for all in their hearts, regardless of differences, passed away suddenly Sunday. 

 

Under Starr's Presidency, Baylor Watched Golden Age Turn Sour

3 hours ago
Photo by Callie Richmond

There may not have been a better time in history to be a Baylor Bear than Aug. 31, 2014. It was opening night for the university’s new football stadium, a $266 million palace built to house its suddenly dominant football team. Former President George W. Bush stood at midfield for the pregame coin toss. Baylor, led by ascendant coach Art Briles, beat Southern Methodist University 45-0.

At long last — the first episode of the Code Switch podcast! We decided to start off with a question we've been fixated on over the past few months: Why is it so hard to talk about whiteness?

Concussions have become part of the daily news. But how much have these brain injuries become part of daily life?

To find out, we asked people across the country about concussions in the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll.

The poll, conducted during the first half of March, found that nearly a quarter of people — 23 percent of those surveyed — said they had suffered a concussion at some point in their lives. Among those who said they'd had a concussion, more than three-quarters had sought medical treatment.

Texas is gearing up for Zika. Last week, state Sen. Charles Schwertner, R-Georgetown, asked state health officials to come up with “a clear and concise plan” for dealing with a possible outbreak.

Even though leaders are on high alert, experts warn there are some underlying health care access issues in Texas that could make dealing with Zika difficult.


Immigrants fleeing gang violence in Central America are again surging across the U.S.-Mexico border, approaching the numbers that created an immigration crisis in the summer of 2014. While the flow of immigrants slowed for much of last year, nothing the U.S. government does seems to deter the current wave of travelers.

From Texas Standard:

Sandra Bland, the 28-year-old Texan arrested and charged with assaulting a public servant at a traffic stop on July 10, 2015, ended up in jail in part because she didn’t have $500 to make bail. Robert Durst, on the other hand, was arrested in New Orleans on charges of murder for slaying a friend, then released on a $2.5 million bond.

Sen. Rodney Ellis (D-Houston) says those two disparate cases come to mind as examples of two separate systems of justice in the country: “One for the rich and one for the poor.”


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

At age 67, former San Antonio ISD Superintendent Sylvester Perez had intended to teach at the University of Texas at San Antonio and otherwise retire.  Then the Texas Education Commissioner asked him to take the job of superintendent in the Edgewood School District, a district so poorly managed the state is now overseeing it’s operation. 

Ryan E. Poppe

It’s been a year since Memorial Day weekend flood waters barreled down the Blanco River near Wimberley, sweeping away homes and killing 12 people.

One year later, Wimberley residents are now better prepared for a major flood, but like shell-shocked soldiers, they still struggle with what happened.

Wimberley homeowner Mack Stringfellow will never forget what he heard from his bedroom window, as the fast moving waters pushed aside the concrete and steel beams of the Fisher Store Bridge, sweeping it down stream. 

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TPR Cinema Tuesdays

Dial M For Murder

See a Hitchcock Masterpiece in 3D! Season opener, May 31 at the Santikos Palladium

Arts & Culture

The Guadalupe Dance Company is starting up a series of recurring dance events and it starts with a phrase in Spanish: Pisando Fuerte.

"Pisando Fuerte means stomping hard, which of course, is Flamenco dance."

The Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center's Jeanette Chavez. And she's talking about something they're calling Flamenco Fridays, which happen the next two Fridays, June 3rd and June 10th.

Nathan Cone / TPR

As she writes on her website, Rachel Laven is an “old soul with big dreams and wanderlust.” At age 23, she’s already had plenty of time to age the soul onstage, playing with her family band, The Lavens, as well as solo gigs and guest spots with YesBodyElse. But there’s no hint of weariness as she talks about her nouveau-bluegrass (“newgrass”) project, Sweet ‘Shine & Honey, formed in 2013.

Nick Simonite

The holiday weekend promises a lot of music and dance. First off, let's head north to one of the area's most unusual places to hear music. Here's what one musician says about this venue.

"I can never really state with enough excitement how cool the acoustic is."

The musician is Axiom Quartet's Patrick Moore and he's talking about the concert they're giving Saturday night at Boerne's Cave Without a Name.

Melissa Evans / Band of the West

“We always try to give a little bit of something for everyone,” says SrA Jennifer Daffinee, a clarinetist with the Mission Winds, one of many smaller ensembles that make up the larger U.S. Air Force Band of the West, stationed at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland. “Everyone that attends our concerts can find something they can gravitate to.”

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Join TPR and the Tobin Center for an evening of chamber music!