Klaus Nigge / USFWS

Texas Coastal Communities Face Challenges Restoring Tourism Economy

Three gangly white birds are prodding the marsh with their long beaks at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. And on this Sunday morning, they have an audience. Peering through the rapid shutter snaps of zoom lenses, a flock of bird watchers are enjoying a rare whooping crane performance.

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The Source is a daily, one-hour program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to connect with our guests and a citywide audience.

State & National News

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Texas Matters: 2018 Election Preview, Observations Of A Harvey Tent City

The filing deadline has come and gone for Texas political candidates who are running in the 2018 mid-terms. On this episode of "Texas Matters," we'll look at the re-election bids of Gov. Greg Abbott and Senator Ted Cruz with KERA's Christopher Connelly (0:41); allegations of sexual harassment by Texas Congressman Blake Farenthold (1:49); the 2018 midterms with Harvey Kronberg, founding editor of the Quorum Report (3:00); the return of tourism along the Texas coast (16:46); and a commentary from Yvette Benavides (21:48) about what life was like in those coast towns before Harvey.

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The San Antonio City Council approved a multi-million dollar incentive package for the United Services Automobile Association to bring nearly 2,000 employees downtown within the next five years.

 

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio uses a ratio of one taxi cab for every 1,700 people in the city to determine how many taxi licenses are issued each year, which means there are 886 taxis in the city.  

 

Now, a group of independent taxi drivers is asking for the city to remove that cap.  

 


File Photo | Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

The chancellor of The University of Texas System is stepping down from his role in 2018.

William McRaven announced his resignation Friday during a special meeting of the UT System board of regents, which was conducted by telephone and broadcast online.

From Texas Standard.

Lots of folks will soon be southbound, spending the holidays with family and friends in Mexico. There are the usual warnings about traveling through regions where there’s considerable cartel violence. Now the Mexican Senate has taken a big step toward deploying the army on the streets – perhaps indefinitely.  Critics are worried  that this is the start of a de facto militarization of Mexico.

Alfredo Corchado, Mexico bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, says Mexico is responding to the large amount of crime and violence associated with the drug cartels that operate there.

From Texas Standard.

For decades, if you pulled into any gas station in Mexico, the brand name on the pump would invariably be PEMEX, the name of the state-run oil monopoly. Now oil giant Exxon Mobil has announced it will open 50 gas stations in Mexico in 2018. Eight are opening this week. Most other major energy companies have begun operations in Mexico since the nation opened its energy economy to private companies.

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

The filing deadline has come and gone for Texas political candidates who are running in the 2018 mid-terms.

On this episode of "Texas Matters," we'll look at the re-election bids of Gov. Greg Abbott and Senator Ted Cruz with KERA's Christopher Connelly (0:41); allegations of sexual harassment by Texas Congressman Blake Farenthold (1:49); the 2018 midterms with Harvey Kronberg, founding editor of the Quorum Report (3:00); the return of tourism along the Texas coast (16:46); and a commentary from Yvette Benavides (21:48) about what life was like in those coast towns before Harvey.

Klaus Nigge / USFWS

Three gangly white birds are prodding the marsh with their long beaks at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. And on this Sunday morning, they have an audience.

Peering through the rapid shutter snaps of zoom lenses, a flock of bird watchers are enjoying a rare whooping crane performance.

 


Mallory Falk

This week on Fronteras:

  • Rural West Texans scramble to try to find affordable health care. 
  • Border Patrol finds Guatemalans freezing at border (4:54). 
  • The Los Angeles Times uncovers corruption in Mexico’s housing developments (5:47). 
  • At a border reunion, a 14-year old boy gets an endearing birthday present (15:46).


John David Scarcliff Photography

From ballet to Mexican songs to the Symphony Pops concert, music dominates this weekend in San Antonio.


Behold, the cocktail avocado. No, that's not a weird cucumber. It's the latest in avocado innovation, on offer at British retail chain Marks & Spencer.

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Talent Contest Now Open!

Area middle and high school students may enter, for cash prizes

Holiday Programming on TPR

Christmas Eve, Day, and New Year's shows!

Arts & Culture

John David Scarcliff Photography

From ballet to Mexican songs to the Symphony Pops concert, music dominates this weekend in San Antonio.


The traditional jazz torch is in good hands, thanks to the members of the San Antonio-based Dirty River Dixie Band. The founders, Chris Alvarado and Kris Vargas, were inspired to learn the Dixieland style after hearing Jim Cullum and his band perform at Texas Lutheran University in Seguin. Now, the elder statesman of the style has taken the group under his wing, even providing some early coaching.

Matt Buikema

One of the city's newest developments, the Pearl, is teaming with the city's oldest, the Missions, for a new twist on a Christmas posada.

 


Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

The first thing you notice about Interstate 35 at South Zaramora is the incessant din of traffic. This is a place designed only for cars and trucks. No trees, no sidewalks, nothing on the human scale.

But now a twisted, vaguely tepee-shaped piece of art has added a very human touch.


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