Animal Welfare

Source: Texas State Aquarium

CORPUS CHRISTI — The deaths of 389 fish at the Texas State Aquarium are being blamed on a mislabeled chemical container.

A statement posted Tuesday on the aquarium’s Facebook page says what staff members thought was an anti-parasite drug was actually a poisonous chemical used in film processing, as a stabilizer in paint and motor fuels, and in cosmetics. That’s based on preliminary lab results.

The aquarium said isn’t yet revealing the source of the mislabeled chemical.

BELLMEAD, Texas — After a Central Texas animal control officer was bitten by a rabid skunk last week, police are asking anyone who believes they may have come into contact with the animal to call them.

Bellmead police Detective Kory Martin tells the Waco-Tribune Herald that the animal control officer was bitten while trying to capture the animal on March 10.

The skunk then taken to the Waco Animal Shelter, where it tested positive for rabies. Bellmead is a town of about 9,000 people located just northeast of Waco.

SAN ANTONIO — An Animal Care Services spokeswoman says a man has agreed to surrender a monkey he said was his service animal after it bit a bank employee in January. Spokeswoman Lisa Norwood says Louie the juvenile macaque monkey is now living at Primarily Primates, a San Antonio rescue center for primates and other exotic animals.

The man, whose name wasn’t released, had said that Louie should be allowed entrance anywhere like other service animals, such as guide dogs.

Texas Safari Club Withdraws Elephant Hunt From Auction

Jan 18, 2015

DALLAS (AP) — A Texas hunting club has canceled plans to auction off a chance to kill an African elephant, the club's executive director said Saturday.

Ben Carter of the Dallas Safari Club told The Associated Press, that the donor of the hunt withdrew his donation.

The African elephant is the Earth's largest land animal. The World Wildlife Fund, the world's leading conservation group, regards it as “vulnerable,” a step below “endangered" and defined as “facing a high risk of extinction in the wild.”

It's been 20 years since San Francisco helped start a revolution: It became the first U.S. community to guarantee a home to every adoptable dog and cat.

Since then, the no-kill movement, as it's called, has been credited with greatly reducing the number of dogs and cats that are euthanized, from some 20 million down to about 3 million each year.

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