Animal Welfare

Texas Safari Club Withdraws Elephant Hunt From Auction

Jan 18, 2015

DALLAS (AP) — A Texas hunting club has canceled plans to auction off a chance to kill an African elephant, the club's executive director said Saturday.

Ben Carter of the Dallas Safari Club told The Associated Press, that the donor of the hunt withdrew his donation.

The African elephant is the Earth's largest land animal. The World Wildlife Fund, the world's leading conservation group, regards it as “vulnerable,” a step below “endangered" and defined as “facing a high risk of extinction in the wild.”

It's been 20 years since San Francisco helped start a revolution: It became the first U.S. community to guarantee a home to every adoptable dog and cat.

Since then, the no-kill movement, as it's called, has been credited with greatly reducing the number of dogs and cats that are euthanized, from some 20 million down to about 3 million each year.

Plagued by controversy and sharp drops in attendance and stock prices, SeaWorld has announced that CEO Jim Atchison will step aside.

U-T San Diego reports that the amusement park also plans on cutting an unspecified number of jobs. Atchison, according to the newspaper, will receive a $2.4 million payout and become vice chairman of the board.

Chairman David F. D'Alessandro will take on the job of chief executive officer while a permanent replacement is sought.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The Animal Defense League of Texas and the City’s Animal Care Services Department have entered into a new multimillion-dollar partnership to prevent dogs from being euthanized. 

The ADL now has three new buildings to take in dogs from the ACS — one for puppies, and two for adult dogs. The city’s 2012 bond program allowed for $2 million toward the construction of these kennels.

ACS Director Kathy Davis said it would allow thousands of dogs to be saved. “We are so close to no kill that we think that this is final jewel in the crown, which will launch us to that level.”

Eileen Pace / TPR News

The city has initiated a push today to microchip pets.

It is the equivalent of a dog’s wallet or a cat’s purse. The microchip technology identifies each animal with its name, pet owner, address and phone number so it can be returned in case its gets lost in the future.