Arts & Culture

Culture
6:23 am
Sat September 7, 2013

In Macho Mexico's Lucha Libre, The 'Lady' Is Often The Champ

Pasión Kristal walks toward the ring in Magdalena Culhuacán, Mexico.
Daniela Herrerías for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 7:56 pm

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Classical Music
4:09 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Filjak Goes Solo This Weekend At St. Mark's Episcopal

Martina Filjak in the TPR studios.
Jack Morgan TPR Arts

Internationally-known pianist Martina Filjak is performing in San Antonio tomorrow at St. Mark's Episcopal Church.

San Antonians have seen Filjak before -- she has performed with the San Antonio symphony -- but now she's back and this time she's going solo.

"I'm going to perform a range of works that are encompassing some [Antonio] Soler, but also Bach and Liszt, but also in the second part of the concert some Schumann piano sonatas," she said.

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World Festivals
11:27 am
Fri September 6, 2013

World Celebrations: Beauty In The Desert

Wodaabe performing a Yaake dance in Niger, c. 1997.
Dan Lundberg Wikimedia Commons

Forget the bathing suits, Cure Salée is for men only.

The Sahara Desert is populated by nomads who use camels for transportation, bring live goats and sheep for fresh victuals as needed, and traverse the land buying and selling. For one week in September, the Tuareg and Fulani tribes gather at In-Gall, a fertile area of salt-laden grass, on which they feed their cattle. (Cows require salt to maintain good health.) This is also an opportunity to meet and mingle, and perhaps find romance.

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Arts & Culture
11:06 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Makin' Hay Leaves Hardberger Park For Its New Home

Makin' Hay exhibit was popular with visitors to Phil Hardberger Park from March, 2011 to Sept., 2013.
Eileen Pace TPR News

The beloved "hay art" at Phil Hardberger Park is going away, but that doesn't mean they will be left with nothing. Art lovers will have something new to celebrate starting this weekend.

Makin’ Hay depicts giant human-like characters stacked up to 17 feet tall, made of steel and bales of hay, involved in various activities. Parks Project Manager Sandy Jenkins said the art is being removed this week and being taken to its home in Bentonville, Ark.

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World Music
4:34 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Yasmine Hamdan, "Ya Nass"

Crammed Discs Records

I first heard the haunting voice of Lebanese singer Yasmine Hamdan on a track called “Lili s’en fout,” from a CD released by Toufic Farroukh. Her captivating vocals added a whole new dimension to the song.

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Arts & Culture
11:21 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Beloved Institute Of Texan Cultures Planning For The Future

Hundreds of thousands of people visit ITC each year.
Expedia

For many San Antonians, there are certain places that immediately bring back the past.

That’s exactly what Angelica Docog, the new director of the Institute of Texan Cultures, is hoping to change.

“I think many people still think of us as a beloved icon, which we are, which we love, which we love being,” she said. “However, I think to some of the challenges we have is -- as you know, ITC was created in 1968 and many people still have that image of us of being stuck, for lack of a better term, in 1968."

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Texas Food
3:12 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Deep-Fry Chefs Keep It Hot And Poppin' In Texas

We had to do it! A fried mic.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 6:11 pm

Every year, the State Fair of Texas awards the most original food that is battered and plunged into a vat of boiling oil.

And it gets weirder every year. The obvious choices came and went in previous competitions — concoctions such as fried ice cream, fried cookie dough and chicken-fried bacon. Now, every year, the same cooks have to top themselves, which is not easy.

Last year, Butch Benavides — a Mexican food restaurateur turned fry-master — won a trophy for his fried bacon cinnamon roll on a stick.

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World Festivals
11:43 am
Thu August 29, 2013

World Celebrations: Reed Dancing In Swaziland

Princess Sikhanyiso Dlamini [left] at the Reed dance festival in Swaziland 2006. She is daughter of the first wife of the king. Royalties of Swaziland can wear red feathers in their hair.
Amanda44 Wikimedia Commons

The Umhlanga Ceremony in Swaziland, South Africa dates back to the 1940s, and was devised as a method to encourage chastity among young women. It has a vague connection to summer camp, when young people share collective experiences away from home.

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8:52 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Accidental 'Blurred Lines' Between Classical And Pop

Lead in text: 
The Internet exploded on Sunday night following Miley Cyrus and Robin Thicke's duet during the MTV Video Music Awards. Some viewers cheered the racy performance by the duo, though the general consensus was one of shock and bewilderment. The song the two performed was "Blurred Lines," Thicke's chart-topping summer jam. But as this report from PRI's "The World" demonstrates, some fans looking for Thicke's hit online got some blurred lines of their own, between a chart-topping pop song and a classical work by Canadian composer John Beckwith.
Canadian classical composer John Beckwith has a hit on his hands. He's had thousands of downloads of music he composed over 15 years ago. It might have something to do with the fact that the piece of music is called Blurred Lines. It shares a name with Robin Thicke's summer chart-topper.
Classical Music
9:09 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Singing And Sandwiches For A Tenor's Centennial

New York native Richard Tucker in the title role of Offenbach's The Tales Of Hoffmann.
Sedge LeBlang Metopolitan Opera Archives

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:21 am

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