Arts & Culture

Arts and culture


The weekend's upon us. Books, music and journalists getting funny onstage are all beckoning to you this weekend. First off, head to the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts.

From Texas Standard:

Few parents put pen to paper to figure out how much they'll spend if their kids end up loving the activity they started at age three. For example, by the time your adorable toddler girl – who’s in love with ballet – graduates high school you will have spent as much as $100,000 on fees, tutus and training. That's according to an estimate by Dance USA.

If your daughter goes pro – her training could be as expensive as a doctor's. But ballet is not just for girls. Boys spend much less on a lifetime of ballet training.


Derek Hudson

Trinity University's drama department has tackled a challenging production. It's called Good Kids, but it's based on something that's not good. Kyle Gillette is director of theater at Trinity University.

"It's inspired kind of loosely by the Steubenville rape case. It deals with what leads up to an assault. How different stereotypes or beliefs about gender and sexual roles play into it."

But does something yanked from the headlines result in good theater? Gillette says an emphatic yes.

A pointy-headed professor. A hand-painted heron. A steel fist rising in the air. These are all works of American art, of a sort — but you can't go to a museum to see them. You go to your local bar or craft brewery.

They're examples of beer tap handles, a business that's expanded in tandem with the explosion of growth in the craft beer industry. As craft brewers try to make their brews stand out in an increasingly crowded field, they're driving the expansion of a singular business: custom-made snazzy beer taps.

Thursday Sandra Cisneros received the National Medal of the Arts, the highest honor given for achievement in the arts. Cisneros said she accepted the medal to honor her family and all other hard working Mexican Americans.

Sandra Cisneros said she briefly thought about turning down the trip to Washington D.C. to accept the National Medal of the Arts.

“At first I wasn’t sure if I should go. I just started a new book and I wanted to be home writing, ” she said.