Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Norma Martinez

Sunny Ozuna is an icon of Tejano music.  Not only has he been making music since his high school days in the 1950s, but he’s an artist whose discography goes on for days. The 74-year-old San Antonio native has a new album that is a retrospective of his oldies R&B hits of the '60s and early '70s.  It’s called Mr. Brown Eyed Soul.  Texas Public Radio's Norma Martinez recently had a chance to talk with "El Cancionero" about the new album and a reflection on his life and career.

Axiomphoto.net by Ternell Washington

On Fridays, we give you a preview of some of the weekend's most interesting events. This week, it's a little different, with an emphasis on the last event.  

First off, on Saturday at the Institute of Texan Cultures Buddhist monks are creating a community mandala out of colorful sands. It's called The Mystical Arts of Tibet, and promises to be both fascinating and beautiful. Then on Saturday night, Texas original Billy Joe Shaver is playing a great live outdoor venue outside of Boerne, the Round Up. 

In 2009, saxophonist Bill King rounded up some of San Antonio’s finest jazz musicians together to raise medical funds for drummer Gerry Gibbs. When they were done with the show, the King William Jazz Collective decided to stay together. King explains that the band exists today not to make a ton of money, but to commission new work. On this show (link below), the opening song, “Lunacity” was written for the band by Los Angeles-based composer Paul Baker.

Edward Benavides

The Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center's event on Saturday night is all about tradition.


This was a rough summer for moviegoers. Low-rated flops like “The Dark Tower” and “Baywatch” did little to attract viewers, according to box office sales. Memorial Day, usually one of the biggest movie release dates of the year, had its weakest showing in almost two decades.

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