Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
2:36 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

A Silent Film, Live On Stage

Sophie Bolles

Running through this weekend, the Overtime Theater presents the final performances of Sophie Bolles’ stage adaptation of one of the creepiest movies of all time, the silent classic, “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.”  It may not be traditional Valentine’s Day Weekend fare, but you can experience an exquisite production that effectively recreates the feel of a silent film live. 

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Deceptive Cadence
1:51 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Subterranean Notes, The New Baroque And A Nod To Minnesota: Music We Love Now

Violist Nadia Sirota.
Samantha West courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 10:52 am

From Christopher Purves' bottomless bass voice and the soaring Sibelius Fifth to a violist's new take on the Baroque, it's this week's list of albums we can't stop listening to. Got a favorite album you've had on repeat lately? Let us know about it the comments section.

Deceptive Cadence
11:23 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Classical Grammys 2013: Same Old Winners, Bold New Music

Members of eighth blackbird performing at the pre-telecast Grammy Awards Sunday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Ah, the joys of Monday morning quarterbacking, classical style.

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Classical Spotlight
10:55 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Joshua Bell Conducts Beethoven, And Teams With...Scarlett Johansson!

Josh Bell's latest release
Sony Classical

Violinist busy with recordings and nominations

The latest from Joshua Bell isn't a violin album, although he does play. It features his "new band," the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, of which Bell is the Music Director; only the second one in the group's 54 year history. The new Sony Classical release features Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphonies No. 4 and No. 7.

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San Antonio Film
9:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Photos: Bluesman Robert Johnson's Deal With The Devil

Tyler Jacob Rollinson waits for his cue to begin the scene downtown in Peacock Alley.
Ryan Loyd Texas Public Radio

Musical styles like rock ‘n’ roll, jazz and R&B trace their roots back to the blues, which partly sprang from one man who recorded his famous "Cross Road Blues" in a San Antonio hotel room.

Blues musician Robert Johnson arrived in San Antonio in 1936 and recorded some of his most famous work, like “I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom” and “Terraplane Blues,” in room 414 of the Gunter Hotel downtown.

The modest itinerant musician would join the legends after this, but it was a fledgling time in America’s recording industry.

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Arts & Culture
12:51 pm
Sat February 9, 2013

Soundtrack Review: "Argo"

Watertower Music

After five Academy Award nominations, composer Alexandre Desplat is one of the busiest musicians in Hollywood today. In 2012 alone, he scored six features and one short film, scoring another nomination this year for his work on Ben Affleck’s award-winning film, “Argo.”

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World Music
5:00 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

World Music Celebrations: Japan's Nude Festival

Hadaka Matsuri Festival, 2006
Flickr User: amanda-esque Flickr

Each week on World Music (Saturday nights from 8-10 on KSTX 89.1 FM), I take a look at celebrations happening around the world. This week, chasing the "naked man" in Japan!

KONOMIYA HADAKA MATSURI FESTIVAL

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Arts Education
3:25 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Say Sí Receives Unexpected $100,000 award

Nicole Amri, SAY SI Program/Community Coordinator with SAY SI Artistic Director Jon Hinojosa and Board Member Michael Mazzei receive unexpected check from IMPACT SA's Ann Parker

On Thursday the Say Sí multi-disciplinary arts program became the unexpected recipient of the $100,000 IMPACT San Antonio grant.

IMPACT San Antonio presents large grants of $100,000 to selected non-profits each October and last year doubled its awards; honoring the San Antonio AIDS Foundation and the Center for Family Relations each with grants to apply toward specific projects.

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KPAC Blog: The Piano
12:52 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Making A Pianistic Point At The SAIPC

SAIPC

I've seen contestants in piano competitions play some large and impressive works when trying to stand out from their other competitors. Big and difficult works like Liszt's "b minor sonata" or Ravel's "Gaspard de la Nuit" are sure to get the judges attention, but there is also the fear of losing the audience.

It is not easy programming your first set at a competition. This week on The Piano, we visit more recordings from last October's San Antonio International Piano Competition.There are only two big and challenging works on the program.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:59 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Remembering Pioneering American Conductor, Poet And Anime Inspiration James DePreist

The late American conductor James DePreist.
Wendy Leher courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 1:31 pm

Pioneering American conductor, National Medal of Arts winner and poet James DePreist died early this morning in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 76 years old. His death, his manager told Deceptive Cadence, stemmed from complications following a heart attack he suffered nearly a year ago.

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