Border & Immigration

Border & Immigration
2:46 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Why El Salvador's Youth Are Fleeing

Photos of many of the “desaparecidos” — the “disappeared ones” (Courtesy of Norman Palomo)

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 2:21 pm

The immigration crisis involving thousands of unaccompanied minors coming from Central America this past summer, may seem far away, but one in three of the so-called “border kids” remain in the U.S.

The children live with their sponsors, usually a relative, while they wait their fate in immigration court. Many are seeking asylum – claiming gang related violence and extreme poverty threaten their lives if they were to go back to their country of origin.

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Fronteras
1:21 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Fronteras: San Diego Stressed Over Marijuana, Chinese Students Home In Texas, & Some Southern Spice

Nearly 132,000 pounds of marijuana were seized in the San Diego area during 2014.
DEA

On Fronteras:

- Law enforcement personnel in San Diego County say the marijuana business is putting children in danger. But marijuana advocates say officers are being alarmist.

-What is it like for international students who leave everything behind in search of a good education in the U.S.? We hear from Chinese students who are new to Texas.

- The Border Patrol is looking for a few good women, and has completed its first recruitment drive directed at women.

-Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides talks about her favorite Mexican-American foods this time of year. Warning: This story could cause severe cravings!

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Fronteras
4:12 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Mexico’s Soda Tax; Dual-Language In N. Texas; Where The Immigrant Children Went

A patient waits to see a doctor at a clinic in Tijuana, Nov. 7, 2014.
Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras:

-- While recent studies have shown that the brain is not an immutable object and can learn and relearn skills post a critical childhood window, there is no doubt that a conducive environment and starting young profoundly impacts a person’s ability to learn, think and process information. This includes language. Educators in Grand Prairie in North Texas talk about the district’s growing dual language program.

-- There’s been plenty of talk of trying to regulate sodas and other sugary drinks to combat obesity. Mexico has already been taxing sugary drinks for almost a year now, and the tax seems to be producing positive results.

-- We now have a better idea of where the Central American minors who came to the U.S. alone earlier this year in droves, ended up. Pew Research Center gives us an update.

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Fronteras
2:19 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

Case to Determine if Landowners Can Export Water; Republicans Contest President’s Immigration Action

Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez fools around with her friend, Claudio Taffer, before going inside the StoryCorps MobileBooth.
Doualy Xaykaothao KERA News

On Fronteras:

-- Can local ranchers and farmers export water from under their land, especially to Mexico, at a time when the U.S. suffers through some of its driest times ever? We look at a water rights case in Texas.
-- State Republican leaders are gearing up to battle President Obama’s executive order on immigration in a variety of ways, beginning with a lawsuit challenging the legality of the action, by Attorney General Gregg Abbott.
-- Groups in San Antonio are trying to help people make sense of the President’s immigration orders. They’re also trying to ensure people don’t become victims of immigration fraud.
-The popular StoryCorps MobileBooth is in Dallas. Dallas County Sheriff, Lupe Valdez, shares the story of her first election, and how she felt she had to beat the odds to win.

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Border & Immigration
1:40 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

Those Who Would Apply for DACA and DAPA Status Face Months of Paperwork Ahead

Eloisa Mata (L) and Maria Calixto (R) work on DACA cases at the Immigration and Human Rights Clinic at St. Mary's University
Credit Jennifer Lloyd / St. Mary's University

  

Immigrants hoping for deferred deportation status have another two to six months before applications will become available for President Obama’s Immigration Accountability Executive Actions program.

But many of them don’t know that.

Attorneys and refugee organizations in Texas have been working non-stop to answer the tide of questions arising from the president’s speech. 

What to do next is the big question, and the answer is layered by individual circumstances but also by the delay in getting info from the government.

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Border & Immigration
4:59 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

RAICES Steps Up Immigration Information

Potential applicants for the president's immigration plan listen to his speech on Thursday, Nov. 20.
Credit Mohammad Abdollahi / RAICES

  

Hundreds of people in San Antonio and South Texas are expected to have questions about what to do next, now that President Obama has laid out his immigration plan.

Texas Public Radio’s Eileen Pace reports a local organization has been expanding its services in the wake of the president’s speech a little over a week ago:

Jonathan Ryan, Director of The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services – or RAICES – says RAICES has been answering questions on Spanish-language telethons where attorneys spent three days last week fielding phone calls.

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Fronteras
2:20 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

UTSA Student On Being “DACAmented”

UTSA junior Diego Mancha
Crystal Chavez

On Fronteras:

-- Diego Mancha is a UT San Antonio student. His mother brought him to this country illegally as a child. About two years ago, Diego was granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — or DACA — status. He says it changed his life. We’ll hear his story.

-- We’ll also meet a North Texas high school student from Guatemala, who’s juggling school and work. It’s worth it all to her, as she’s getting a fresh start after escaping violence back home.

-- Also, Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides shares childhood memories of Thanksgiving Day. She tells us about the interesting way her father scored the family table’s centerpiece.

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Immigration Reform
6:07 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Too Much Or Too Little? Presidential Action Leaves People Divided

A group of concerned citizens await the for the livestream to start at Divine Redeemer Presbyterian on the westside
Joey Palacios Texas Public Radio

Texas Attorney-General and Governor-elect, Greg Abbott, said he planned to sue the Obama administration in response to Thursday’s executive action by the President on immigration. There are others, though, who were happier with the President, but not quite satisfied.

A group of 25 people watched the White House’s live streaming of the Presidential address, at the Divine Redeemer Presbyterian on the Westside.

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Fronteras
2:09 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Executive Action On Immigration, Mexican Murders, And A "Richest-Poor" Neighborhood on Fronteras

A child peers through a window facing a City Heights alley, Oct. 21, 2014
Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras:

-- President Obama has kept his promise. He took executive action on the nation’s immigration laws. We get reaction from San Antonio, Texas.

-- Anguish is mounting over the Mexican government’s response to the collective murders of 43 college students. The protests aren’t letting up and there’s a sense that this incident has started a movement that is going to stick.

-- We’ll hear how one school district in north Texas is educating a growing number of immigrant children, whose primary language isn’t English.

-City Heights could be San Diego’s “richest-poor” neighborhood. There’s been decades of philanthropic investment there. Two foundations have spent more than a quarter of a billion dollars in City Heights since 2000. So what's become of all that money? Are its residents better off?

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Border & Immigration
8:41 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Outgoing Lt. Governor Announces Draw Down Of National Guard Troops On The Border

Outgoing Lt. Governor, David Dewhurst, has announced that the state will begin ramping down the number of National Guard troops assisting with the state’s border surge in the Rio Grande Valley, that's following an $86 million extension of the executive order that first sent the Guard to the Texas-Mexico border.

He isn’t able to discuss the numbers, but Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst chalks the gradual troop withdrawal to a drop in the number of crossings happening in South Texas.

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