Border & Immigration

A new government report recommends that the U.S. Border Patrol double its internal affairs investigators to focus on corruption and the alleged mistreatment of migrants along the Mexican border.

The interim report, written at the request of Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, focuses on three themes: rooting out corruption within the agency; reining in the unauthorized use of force by Border Patrol agents; and improving departmental transparency.

David Martin Davies

The Downtown San Antonio Greyhound bus station is a bustling place. Built in 1945 it’s the second oldest operating bus station in the Greyhound system. There is no escaping its vintage look even with the multiple flat screen TV’s on the deco style speckled walls.

On this Saturday afternoon there’s the familiar scene of departure.  Francesca, a woman from Guatemala and Freddie, her 9-year-old son, are trying to make sense of their bus ticket.

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas is the number one U.S. destination for refugees.  The decision to leave home for the journey is a tough choice.

--In the wake of police confrontations, more Texas police departments are buying body cameras for their officers.  

--A Texas company is a go-to source in the growing market for police body cameras.

--Mexicans who have been departed say it’s hard to earn the parole they need to fight their cases in the United States.

--Women make up only 25 percent of workers in the male dominated oil business. 

Joaquín Castro
Joaquín Castro website image

SAN ANTONIO — Several members of Congress will visit two South Texas detention facilities that house immigrant mothers and children mostly from Central America.

Eight House Democrats next week will tour the two facilities in Karnes City and Dilley, which U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement opened after tens of thousands of unaccompanied children and families crossed the Texas-Mexico border last summer.

The eight are among 136 House Democrats asking the government to stop holding immigrant women and children in detention.

ICE, however, says the facilities are an effective and humane way to keep families together until they appear before immigration judges seeking asylum.

Wikimedia

  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas spends millions on border security but wants the Obama administration to pay for it.

--Texas farmers survived the drought.  Now they’re working to survive recent flooding.

--Water problems also are plaguing New Mexico where runoff from the storms is polluting the Rio Grande.

--A Fort Worth organization is helping young people recover from the financial consequences of gang life.

--An Austin mother in public housing is struggling to keep her son in one school. 

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