Border & Immigration

Joy Diaz / KUT Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

--A half-million people on the Texas-Mexico border live in colonias which often lack running water, electricity and basic services.  The Obama Administration wants border states to spend more money to improve life in these communities.

--The Cardinal considered to be Pope Francis’ most reliable advisor blames Mexican drugs lords for the surge of Central American children crossing the border into the United States.

--Attorneys get courtroom training on how to win asylum for detained immigrant mothers and children.

Rio Grande Valley Adds To Border Horse Patrol

Apr 30, 2015
Courtesy: U.S. Customs And Border Protection

MISSION, Texas — Jared Barton has ridden horses since he was a toddler.

But rumbling on a Florida cattle ranch isn’t the same as the trails he’ll traverse going forward — the rough terrain of immigrant and drug smuggling trails in the Rio Grande Valley.

The Monitor reports Barton is one of the latest members of the U.S. Border Horse Patrol, a specialty group of agents that work on horseback and have been doing so since the early 1920s.

The 38-year-old agent was one of seven agents who officially completed a six-week training course to join the group in the Rio Grande Valley sector.

As NPR and other news outlets report about the hundreds of people killed this month when the ship they were on went down off the Libyan coast, the stories are referring to those who died as "migrants."

Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

--A coalition comes together to fight unprecedented natural gas pipelines in West Texas near Big Bend that would transport energy to Mexico. Residents are worried.

--A proposed Texas law pushes for an end to so called sanctuary cities.  But San Antonio police say the city is safer because immigrants can report crimes without fear of deportation.

--It’s Fiesta time in San Antonio and that means medal madness. Everyone’s having a good time collecting medals during the celebration. 

Richard Morgan / Fronteras

PHOENIX — There won’t be nearly as many immigrant children who cross the border on their own this summer as there were last year, top officials say.

Daniel Ragsdale, deputy director for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said authorities expect far fewer migrant children and families than the influx last year that gained worldwide attention and left Border Patrol agents unable to process so many people. “I’m happy to say all the work we’ve done last year is bearing fruit,” Ragsdale said.

Ronald D. Vitiello, the Border Patrol’s deputy chief, agreed. “This year is far better off than last year,” he said.

Pages