Border & Immigration

Along the dry, rocky desert of El Paso, Texas, a brown fence stretches for miles. The fence marks the southern U.S. border that separates El Paso from its Mexican sister city, Juarez.

Twenty-two-year-old Antonio Villaseñor-Baca was born and raised in El Paso. His hometown is part of a huge "borderplex," where three cities — El Paso, Texas; Las Cruces, N.M.; and Juarez, Mexico — converge. Villaseñor-Baca has an uncle in Juarez, and while growing up, his dad would take him back and forth over the border a lot.

To Villaseñor-Baca, Juarez doesn't seem like another country.

New York University Press

Laura E. Gómez is a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles.  Her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race” explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.

Gómez said when 19th century Americans started moving west, they encountered Mexican-Americans, which fell in between the existing racial class of black and white.


New York University Press

On Fronteras:

 

In 1848,  the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo brought to an end the Mexican-American war, which was started in 1846 over a territorial dispute in Texas. The treaty led to land that has become Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah and Wyoming.

Laura E. Gómez, a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles, joins us to discuss her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race,” which explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.


Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

Several families divided by the Trump administration's family separation policies have reunited in San Antonio before beginning the next stage of their journey.


The Trump administration faces the same challenge as its predecessors: how to ensure the tens of thousands of unauthorized immigrant families who are apprehended each year show up for their immigration hearings. Trump wants to lock more of them up. Immigrant advocates want him to expand alternatives to detention, which are already widely in use.

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