Border & Immigration

Fronteras
2:58 pm
Fri November 14, 2014

Texas Lawsuit Against U.S. Border Patrol Could Set Precedent

Cindy Cornett Seigle via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

On Fronteras:

  • We meet a Dallas public high school student from the Democratic Republic of Congo. He tells us about the challenges of fitting in at school here.
  • If a lawsuit against the Border Patrol moves forward, individual agents could be sued over their actions during so called "roving patrol" stops. A Texas case against the Border Patrol may set an important precedent. We have the details.
  • Also, Congressman Lloyd Doggett speaks about the release this week of an immigrant rights activist from San Antonio.

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Fronteras
2:00 pm
Fri November 7, 2014

Analysts Say Latinos "Underwhelmed" By Candidates In 2014 Election

David Martin Davies TPR News

On Fronteras:
-- There was a lot of expectation and many predictions about the so-called “Latino vote” in the 2014 elections. We get a full recap from the polling and research firm, Latino Decisions.
-- Federal officials say the sickest five percent of Americans rack up more than half of all health care costs. We report on a program in San Diego that’s reducing emergency room visits and improving people’s health.
-- Rattlesnakes are just a part of life in West Texas. Most people try to steer clear of them. We meet a Fort Davis man with a love for snakes, who says they’re just misunderstood.

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Fronteras
8:24 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

New Study Shows Genetic Trait May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk for Some Hispanic Women

National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.

On Fronteras-- Latinas are less likely to develop breast cancer than other ethnic groups. Now researchers think they know why. A new study shows a genetic variant may protect some Hispanic women from developing breast cancer. The largest immigrant detention facility in the country is under construction in South Texas. What’s unusual, though, is how the government bypassed the regular bidding process, giving the contract to a small Arizona town.

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Fronteras
4:50 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Universities And Greeks Unite To Confront Sexual Assault Related To Frat Culture

The SDSU chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon has a house in the center of "fraternity circle." They are known for throwing elaborate parties.
Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras: The attention paid to rape on college campuses has brought fraternity culture under a microscope. Some universities, and even some Greeks, are starting to confront sexual assault related to fraternity life. A journalist has been trekking the length of the entire Rio Grande in an attempt to get people to pay attention to the disappearing river. He hopes the journey will spur a serious discussion about rescuing a river that provides water to millions of people in two countries. As Mexico works to reform its energy industry, cartels are branching into fuel theft. Also, "inaugural poet" Richard Blanco talks about his memoir, "The Prince of Los Cocuyos."

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Fronteras
5:05 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Where Do Abbott And Davis Stand On Border Security?

Texas Army National Guard

On Fronteras: We look at border security and how the Texas gubernatorial candidates, Republican Greg Abbott and Democrat Wendy Davis, differ on deploying National Guard troops to the border. This report is part of a series called Five Days in October, by KERA, The Dallas Morning News and NBC5. Three Central American families seeking asylum in the United States  saw the outside of the Karnes County Residential Center for the first time in two months. We bring you their story. We speak to San Antonio writer, Ito Romo, about his collection of brutally candid short stories,"The Border is Burning." In addition, Dia de los Muertos, the Day of The Dead, is around the corner. We get a behind-the-scenes look at how a new animated film centered on the holiday made it to the big screen.

 

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Border & Immigration
4:13 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

From Darkness To Light: At The Heart Of The Immigration Crisis Are Stories Of Horror And Hope

The woman with the nickname Margarita told reporters of her journey from Honduras, escaping domestic violence at the hands of gangs.
Ryan Loyd TPR News

On Tuesday evening, three small families were led out of the Karnes County Residential Center to begin a new journey.

A woman who is being called Margarita cradled her two year old son, nicknamed José. They took their first steps out of the center southeast of San Antonio into the bright Texas sun. The tension could be felt in the air. Margarita and two other mother and child pairs, San Pedro Sula natives, made bond through the immigration law group, RAICES, which spent more than $15,000 that was collected through donations.

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Border & Immigration
4:20 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Songs Of Protest And Symbols Of Hope, As Protestors Rally At Under-Fire Detention Center

Picketers place paper handcuffs on the sign in front of the Karnes City Residential Center to signify that the facility is a jail.
Ryan Loyd TPR News

Ringing protest chants and flashy signs greeted security at the Karnes County Residential Center Saturday, southeast of San Antonio, where 60 people gathered in solidarity with immigrant women and children housed inside; immigrants who made it across the U.S. border after fleeing violence in Central America.

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Fronteras
3:33 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

Mexico Energy Reform Faces Challenges: Border Pipelines & Organized Crime

An oil rig in the Permian Basin of Texas; Mexico wants to build at least two pipelines to import energy from here.
"Hitchhacking" via Flickr

On Fronteras: Energy reform in Mexico is promising huge economic benefits for Texas...but there are big challenges ahead, including infrastructure and organized crime. New Mexico has some of the worst figures in the nation for alcohol-related illnesses and substance abuse, and so Fronteras sheds light on fetal alcohol syndrome. We'll also hear from the state climatologist about drought in Texas.  And an exclusive from Marfa Public Radio: the Chinati Mountains State Natural Area in south Presidio County is finally going to be open to the public.  

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Fronteras
4:42 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

Groups Rushing To Register Latinos As Voter Registration Deadline Nears

David Martin Davies TPR News

On Fronteras: The deadline to register to vote in the November General Election is nearing. Groups are working nationally, and in Texas, to get Latinos registered. But registering is just the first step; getting Latinos to the polls is the next challenge. Many of us do our part to help the environment. We recycle, carpool or ride bikes. But some take it further than others. We hear about a California resident who has transformed his home into a green building wonderland.

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Fronteras
12:58 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

El Niño Might Help Ease Texas Drought

The National Drought Mitigation Center

On Fronteras: We look at how an El Niño weather pattern might help out the Texas drought this fall. Mexico is opening its energy sector to foreign participation for the first time since 1938. That has two towns, in two countries, wanting to harness geography and oil industry experience for each other’s benefit. One of the first things newly nationalized citizens do is register to vote. In San Diego, there’s one third party growing faster than the rest. We explore why. And something strange is happening at the busiest port of entry along the U.S.-Mexico border. Border wait times  are plummeting at the San Diego-Tijuana border crossing.

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