Border & Immigration

An estimated 11 million immigrants live and work in the United States illegally. Their fate is one of the big policy questions facing the country. The story of how that population grew so large is a long one that's mostly about Mexico, and full of unintended consequences.

Prior to the 1920s, the U.S. had few restrictions on immigration, save for a few notable exclusions.

"Basically, people could show up," says Jeffrey Passel, of the Pew Research Center.

For workers in Mexico, crossing into the U.S. made a lot of economic sense, then and now.

Photo by Katie Schoolov / KPBS

This week on Fronteras:  

·         Refugees continue to resettle in the U.S.  but struggle to find affordable places to live.

 

·         Ill El Salvadoran woman removed from hospital gets released from Alvarado detention center.

 

·         New Mexico is reassessing how it tests students. Some parents want to see a change.

 

·         Los Vaqueros Rio Grande carry on a 45 year tradition – riding horses from the Mexican border to the Houston Stock Show in honor of Hispanic heritage. 

 

·         Winning on and off the court.  A girls basketball coach scores points with her diverse team of students outside the rim.

 

Lorne Matalon

This week on Fronteras:

  • Mexico may be rethinking its cooperation with the U.S. on security issues due to President Trump's economic threats.
  • Sent home because of the president's travel ban, an Iranian national studying in California finds comfort in the show of support she received.
  • The travel ban is also affecting foreign-born physicians who practice in the U.S.
  • Young immigrants who currently have deportation relief worry that it won't last long.

Kris Arciaga

 

 

  

This week on Fronteras: 

 

·         Mexicans living in the U.S. who send money to relatives back home worry about President Trump’s threats to tax those remittances as a way to pay for his planned border wall.

 

·         Austin schools educate students on how to respond if they encounter Immigration and Custom Enforcement agents.

 

·         A New Mexico Dakota pipeline protester doesn’t feel defeated following a court ruling okaying construction.

 

Sanctuary Cities, Immigration, The Border On Film

Feb 10, 2017
Ryan Poppe

  

This week on FRONTERAS:   

 

·         The Texas Senate passes a bill that would cut funding to sanctuary cities.

 

·         Travis County explores alternative funding to replace $1.5 million dollars cut due to immigration policy.

 

·         In Washington, Republicans move to reduce the number of green cards given out each year.

 

·      U.S. energy companies want to do business with Mexico’s troubled energy company Pemex, but reform is needed first.

  

·    Viewing the U.S.-Mexico border through the art of cinema at a film festival hosted in both countries.

 

Pages