Border & Immigration

Photo courtesy of The Refuge Ranch.

This week on Fronteras:

  • Human trafficking is an international crime, but Texas authorities are learning to understand it as a local atrocity.
  • The fight to get Mexican-American studies in public schools (6:18).
  •  How a family divided by the U.S.-Mexico border struggles to keep a sense of normalcy in their lives (16:20)


From Texas Standard.

Scouting has long been considered a path for young people to learn life skills, but a program along the United States-Mexico border goes a lot further than how to start a campfire or care for a park. It's run under the auspices of the U.S. Border Patrol, and it’s not so much camping in the wilderness but rather something much more intense, closer to bona fide basic military training.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT News

This week on Fronteras:

  • Border Patrol agents go through extremes on the job, ranging from extreme boredom to high-stress situations. 0:00
  • Some immigrant laborers who responded to Harvey don’t get paid.  4:05

  • Bi-partisan support in Texas for new DREAM Act legislation to protect recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program from deportation.  5:43

  • A study on discrimination shows many Latinos weren’t encouraged to pursue higher education. 8:20

  • A  binational study of heart disease is looking at how it affects people of Mexican ancestry. 13:23


Photo credit: Brandon Quester / inewsource

This week on Fronteras:

  • A look at the history of U.S. efforts to contain immigration and drug smuggling with barriers on our southern border with Mexico. (0:00)
  • Latinos say they continue to experience discrimination when trying to buy houses or rent homes. (4:28)
  • In Albuquerque, the Pueblo Film Festival presents a more realistic view of Native American stories. (8:56)
  • As San Antonio’s Tricentennial approaches, people are digging into their Spanish roots. (12:51)


Norma Martinez / Jo Anne Gonzales Murphy

San Antonio is on the verge of celebrating its tricentennial — 300 years since the Presidio de Bexar, the Villa de Bexar, and the Mission Valero were settled by soldiers, civilians and priests.

A lot of South Texans can trace their ancestry back to 1718 and beyond.  For those who can’t, a nonprofit is making it easier to follow their family tree.


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