Border & Immigration

Mexican Border Workers Make A Push To Unionize

Dec 19, 2015

Miriam Delgado was one of 700 workers making printer cartridges in the border city of Juárez for the American-owned printer and software company Lexmark. She's the main reason foreign companies choose to set up factories, also known as maquiladoras, in places like northern Mexico.

Workers like her will work for cheap, as little as $7 a day. After five years working a nine-hour shift on an assembly line, Delgado began pressing for a raise. Then, last week, she was fired.

From Texas Standard:

The surge in immigrant children has prompted Gov. Greg Abbott to extend National Guard deployments at the Texas border. Paul Weber, a reporter covering the story for the Associated Press, says while the exact number of troops is unknown, it’s probably in the low hundreds.

“In December of 2014 when Gov. Perry first deployed the National Guard to the border, he sent up to 1,000 troops,” Weber says. “But as recently as February, state officials said that there's now only about 200 troops there. And that was in anticipation of an expected drawdown to eventually get the troops out of there.”

 


The first group of immigrant children arrived in Ellis County Friday afternoon. Hundreds of kids will stay at the Lakeview Camp and Retreat Center in between Maypearl and Waxahachie.

From Texas Standard:

Undocumented immigrant women detained in the privately run T. Don Hutto Residential Detention Facility went on a hunger strike in October.

Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the operation, has denied there ever was a hunger strike, saying that an individual has to miss nine consecutive meals for such a protest to be called a true hunger strike.

 


Texas Parks and Wildlife

Fronteras airs Fridays at 3 p.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m., on Texas Public Radio stations.  Following are stories you'll hear this week.

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