Border & Immigration

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

On Fronteras:

-- Can local ranchers and farmers export water from under their land, especially to Mexico, at a time when the U.S. suffers through some of its driest times ever? We look at a water rights case in Texas.
-- State Republican leaders are gearing up to battle President Obama’s executive order on immigration in a variety of ways, beginning with a lawsuit challenging the legality of the action, by Attorney General Gregg Abbott.
-- Groups in San Antonio are trying to help people make sense of the President’s immigration orders. They’re also trying to ensure people don’t become victims of immigration fraud.
-The popular StoryCorps MobileBooth is in Dallas. Dallas County Sheriff, Lupe Valdez, shares the story of her first election, and how she felt she had to beat the odds to win.

Jennifer Lloyd / St. Mary's University

  

Immigrants hoping for deferred deportation status have another two to six months before applications will become available for President Obama’s Immigration Accountability Executive Actions program.

But many of them don’t know that.

Attorneys and refugee organizations in Texas have been working non-stop to answer the tide of questions arising from the president’s speech. 

What to do next is the big question, and the answer is layered by individual circumstances but also by the delay in getting info from the government.

Mohammad Abdollahi / RAICES

  

Hundreds of people in San Antonio and South Texas are expected to have questions about what to do next, now that President Obama has laid out his immigration plan.

Texas Public Radio’s Eileen Pace reports a local organization has been expanding its services in the wake of the president’s speech a little over a week ago:

Jonathan Ryan, Director of The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services – or RAICES – says RAICES has been answering questions on Spanish-language telethons where attorneys spent three days last week fielding phone calls.

Crystal Chavez

On Fronteras:

-- Diego Mancha is a UT San Antonio student. His mother brought him to this country illegally as a child. About two years ago, Diego was granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — or DACA — status. He says it changed his life. We’ll hear his story.

-- We’ll also meet a North Texas high school student from Guatemala, who’s juggling school and work. It’s worth it all to her, as she’s getting a fresh start after escaping violence back home.

-- Also, Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides shares childhood memories of Thanksgiving Day. She tells us about the interesting way her father scored the family table’s centerpiece.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Texas Attorney-General and Governor-elect, Greg Abbott, said he planned to sue the Obama administration in response to Thursday’s executive action by the President on immigration. There are others, though, who were happier with the President, but not quite satisfied.

A group of 25 people watched the White House’s live streaming of the Presidential address, at the Divine Redeemer Presbyterian on the Westside.

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