Border & Immigration

Fronteras Desk
12:37 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

The Stories Of Families Separated By Deportation

An American boy walks down a street in Guanajuato, Mexico with his father, a deported Mexican national.
Erin Siegal McIntyre

As Congress debates future guest worker programs, unresolved issues remain with both current and past guest workers. Also on the show: A multi-part series on deportation. We look at the children left behind when parents are deported and what happens to the kids deported by the United States.

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Fronteras Desk
1:16 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

New Mexico Debating Whether To Accept Washington's Nuclear Waste

A handmade card shows opposition to nuclear waste traveling along New Mexico highways to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M.
Elaine Baumgartel KUNM

Fronteras: For several decades mules have delivered mail to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, but now the company that runs the mule train plans to stop the package service. Plans to ship nuclear waste from leaky tanks in the state of Washington to New Mexico are stirring up an old debate about the storage of toxic waste. Also, filmmaker Rodrigo Gudiño tells us about his latest work, which  is fueled by his earliest memories of being horrified by religious images.

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Fronteras Desk
12:44 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Cities Across Southwest Courting Drone Companies

A coalition of local defense industry advocates hope to brand San Diego as the drone capital of the world.
U.S. Marines

On Fronteras: San Diego is in the forefront of a competition to attract big players in the drone industry. New classes in San Diego focus on students struggling to master English. A small population of Muslims have made Tijuana their home. Even though many border crossings are illegal, they play a big role in family identity and history.

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Fronteras Desk
12:14 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Threats To Reporters Cause News Blackouts In Mexico

“Reporter, you’re going to die,” spelled out in hot sauce on the kitchen table of Hiram Gonzalez.
Nogales International

Fronteras: Under the new Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, attacks against news agencies appear to have increased. A San Diego interpreter finds himself at the center of a tense international conflict, and it may have cost him his job. We examine how the lengthy drought has started a nasty legal battle over water rights between Texas and New Mexico. Semana Santa (Holy Week) continues and Mexican citizens are traveling to the U.S. in droves, boosting San Antonio's economy.

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U.S.-Mexico Economy
10:45 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Mexican Nationals Make Retail Pilgrimage For Semana Santa

A family of shoppers from Mexico takes a break in San Antonio’s Shops at La Cantera. During high travel times the mall attracts many people from across the border to shop.
Joey Palacios Texas Public Radio

This week is Semana Santa (Holy Week), and it's a big week in Mexico - schools cancel classes and businesses take a holiday. It is also a big week for retailers in the Southwest United States because Mexican shoppers cross the border in droves.

For San Antonio it’s one of the biggest weeks of the year for retail sales, and retailers have high hopes for this year’s Semana Santa spending spree because of a powerful peso.

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Border & Immigration
1:33 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Lamar Smith Has His Own Litmus Test For Immigration Reform

Rep. Lamar Smith could be a deciding vote if immigration reform is to pass.
Joey Palacios Texas Public Radio

As different political voices in Washington D.C. lay out their views for what immigration reform should look like, San Antonio Congressman Lamar Smith described his litmus test for viable immigration reform. 

Smith is seen an influential vote needed for immigration reform to pass the House and said there are three elements that must be included in any proposal.

"First of all we need to secure both our border and our interior," he said.

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Fronteras Desk
11:25 am
Thu March 21, 2013

Historic Genocide Trial & Declining Interest In Chicano Studies

The Guatemalan Foundation for Forensic Anthropology has been digging up mass graves for years, uncovering evidence for war crimes trials, and returning remains to victims' families.
Jill Replogle Fronteras

After decades of impunity, a former Guatemalan strongman stands trial for genocide. How the proposed minimum wage increase would affect Latinos. How a declining interest in Chicano studies reflects an identity shift for many Latinos. This summer, Phoenix, Ariz. is trying to diversify city lifeguards, the classic summer job for teens.

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Fronteras Desk
11:23 am
Thu March 21, 2013

Historic Genocide Trial & The Declining Interest In Chicano Studies

The Guatemalan Foundation for Forensic Anthropology has been digging up mass graves for years, uncovering evidence for war crimes trials, and returning remains to victims' families.
Jill Replogle Fronteras

After decades of impunity, a former Guatemalan strongman stands trial for genocide. How the proposed minimum wage increase would affect Latinos. How a declining interest in Chicano studies reflects an identity shift for many Latinos. This summer, Phoenix, Ariz. is trying to diversify city lifeguards, the classic summer job for teens.

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Immigration Reform
9:11 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Sen. Rand Paul Takes Turn On Immigration Reform - Work Visas

Rand Paul is known for his conservative Tea Party stance, but his latest comments about work visas are turning some heads.
Richard Morgan Fronteras

As the Republican Party continues to grapple with finding a solution to its Latino voter problem, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has dramatically softened his stance on immigration reform.

Paul told the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday that there could be a place in America for undocumented workers.

At first there was some confusion about what Paul said to the Hispanic Chamber. It was reported that the he had jumped the Tea Party ship and was endorsing comprehensive immigration reform including a pathway to citizenship.

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Fronteras Desk
12:34 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Fronteras: How Is Sequestration Affecting The Border?

The Otay Mesa commercial port of entry clogs up in the afternoons, but is often nearly empty in the mornings
Katrina Farmer Fronteras

Despite Warnings, Border Waits Not Longer Than Usual

Under the federal budget cuts known as sequestration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection is slated to have $500 million slashed from its budget. Border authorities warn this is already making for longer waits at international airports and land crossings. Our Fronteras Desk reporter Jill Replogle went out to take the pulse on the U.S.-Mexico border.

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