Border & Immigration

From Texas Standard:

East Texas has seen multiple deadly downpours this year. Yet in south Texas, Brooks County Sheriff-elect Benny Martinez says he wants it to rain along the border to alleviate the unbearable heat“I’m hoping the rains continue,” Martinez said Monday. “I’m hoping we get a hurricane.”

The heat index down south was over 100 degrees for most of July, which has in part contributed to the hundreds of migrant deaths. Kristian Hernandez, with the McAllen Monitor, says the sheriff’s bold statement comes from his experience with the effect the heat can have on migrants crossing the Texas-Mexico border.


Lorne Matalon / Marfa Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:   

-Crooked middlemen are just one of three threats facing fair trade coffee farmers in Latin America.

-While attention centers on police shootings of African Americans, Native Americans actually have a higher rate of being killed by law enforcement.

-How the Latino Victory Project is building political power to ensure Hispanic voices are reflected in all levels of government.

- Sobriety goes hi-tech.  Can an app help you determine a drinking problem?

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

·         Texas Latinos have their say at the historic Democratic National Convention.

·         Latino voters file lawsuit against the way Texas elects judges claiming it violates the Voting Rights Act.

·         In San Diego, dismembered Honduran migrants raise awareness about the dangers of migrating by train.

·         New Mexico’s efforts to test a backlog of sexual assault evidence next on Fronteras, first the news

KPBS

This week on Fronteras: 

·         As Donald Trump becomes the GOP presidential nominee, a new poll shows residents on both sides of U.S.-Mexico border don’t want his proposed wall.

·         Investors in a Mexican resort promoted by Donald Trump that never got built say they were duped by the presidential nominee.

·         Should crimes against police be hate crimes? Texas Governor Greg Abbott thinks so. But some crime experts worry the strategy will backfire.

From Texas Standard:

El Paso and Juarez are sister cities of sorts. They share a border, cultural ties, and of course, economic ones. But even though the towns are close, the cost of living between the two are worlds apart.

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