Border & Immigration

Fronteras
2:14 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Steve Inskeep On Reporting From The "Borderland"

Texas rancher Dob Cunningham, right, stands on the edge of his 800-acre ranch in Quemado, Texas, which touches the Rio Grande. On the other side, Mexico.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Fronteras: A conversation with "Morning Edition" host Steve Inskeep, who joins us to talk about NPR’s Borderland series: stories about the people, goods and culture that cross back and forth across the U.S.-Mexico border. Mónica Ortiz Uribe introduces us to the Barrio Aztecas of El Paso, one of the more frightening gangs that operate on the border. Lent is a time of spiritual reflection, but it also means a change in diet for those who take part. Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides tells us about how the foods of lent can be sinfully good.

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Parallels
4:49 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Troncoso Family Finds Success On U.S. Side Of Border With Mexico

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

About midway through our road trip along the U.S./Mexico border, my colleagues and I rode up a mountain. Okay. Should we hop in?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Hop in.

INSKEEP: We boarded a tram car suspended by a cable.

KAINAZ AMARIA: Are we going that way?

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Borderlands
3:00 am
Mon March 24, 2014

On The Mend, But Wounds Of Violence Still Scar Juarez

Workers arrive at an assembly plant located along the border.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

We had just finished our time in Juarez, Mexico, when we had dinner with some distant relations on the U.S. side of the border. "You," one of my relatives said, "are the first Juarez survivors we've seen in some time."

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Parallels
11:22 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Always Watching: A Fragile Trust Lines The U.S.-Mexico Border

Dob Cunningham (left) and his friend Larry Johnson look over the edge of Cunningham's 800-acre ranch in Quemado, Texas.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 1:21 pm

We drove 2,428 miles on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, and it's safe to say that for much of the road trip, we were being watched.

Border Patrol agents, customs officers, cameras, sensors, radar and aircraft track movement in the Borderland. None of that has stopped the struggle to control the border, or the debate over how best to do it.

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Fronteras
1:43 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Energy Boom, Light Pollution Threaten Astronomy In West Texas

A glow over the northern horizon at McDonald Observatory near Ft. Davis,Texas. The light is generated by round-the-clock oil and gas operations in the Permian Basin.
Bill Wren

Fronteras: The energy boom in Texas and New Mexico is inadvertently compromising the jet-black night skies that astronomers need to do their research. After several decades in the doldrums, the Mexican film industry is seeing some light on the horizon. There’s been a rise of federal immigration crimes -- we speak to an expert from Pew Research about what’s driving that growth. Farmers and ranchers from across the nation are calling for action on immigration reform and the Texas Farm Bureau is asking Congress to “get ‘er done” to help farmers compete.

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Border & Immigration
12:19 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Farmers, Ranchers Calling For Immigration Reform

Farmers and ranchers from across the United States are calling for action on immigration reform. The Texas Farm Bureau is asking Congress to “get ‘er done” to help farmers compete.

Texas Farm Bureau State Director Russell Boening runs a dairy farm just south of San Antonio. But this week he is in Washington, D.C., at the National Press Club talking about immigration reform.

“Some of our labor is going to have to be imported or more of our food is going to be imported. So I hope we can get that message across to all of our leaders," he said.

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Fronteras
2:52 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Fearing Rape, Migrant Women Prepare For Crossing With Birth Control

A poster hanging in a migrant shelter in Nogales, Mexico. The text reads "I have the right to be respected physically, sexually and psychologically," in Spanish.
Jude Joffe-Block

On Fronteras: Women migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border face many dangers on the journey, including rape. The crimes usually go unpunished. But there’s one case now in an Arizona court that is different.

...also, the U.S. Border Patrol says it’s refining its techniques when facing people who throw rocks at agents along the border.

...and Burmese refugees living in the Southwest are working hard to learn English - even though some are illiterate. They’re future depends on learning the language.

Finally, as spring rolls around, hear a commentary about the promise of the season, which can be both bountiful and bleak.

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Fronteras
11:06 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Despite Water Crisis, Some Arizona Farmers Are Exporting Crops

Some of Yuma County's alfalfa will go to feedlots and dairies in the region. Others will be shipped overseas to China, where the demand for hay has grown.
Laurel Morales Fronteras

Fronteras: As California struggles with its water crisis and the rest of the southwest deals with drought, some criticize Arizona farmers for exporting some of their crops overseas. In the final part of our series "Pipe Dreams" we look at the controversy of indirectly exporting water overseas. A new lawsuit in Arizona federal court is trying to block new state abortion restrictions from taking effect on April 1. What's at stake in that state's latest legal fight over abortion? Also, crowded college classrooms have some U.S. students heading south of the border for their higher education.

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Latin America
4:02 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Preview: Steve Inskeep Travels U.S.-Mexico Border

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 12:59 pm

Steve Inskeep has begun a journey along the U.S.-Mexico border — from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. NPR reporters are also pursuing stories of people, goods and culture crossing the border. Over the next two weeks, the team will be sharing impressions at NPR's On The Road blog as it prepares stories to broadcast on Morning Edition and other NPR programs in late March.

Fronteras
2:09 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Central American Children Look North To Flee Violence & Find Their Mothers

Photo courtesy Sonia Nazario

Fronteras: Some Maricopa County sheriff’s deputies in Arizona have agreed to go through a round of cultural training to help curb tensions with indigenous and Latino residents. Some members of San Diego's LGBT community are not embracing a new ad by Republican congressional candidate Carl DeMaio, who is gay. Authorities are seeing a huge increase in Central American asylum-seekers at the nation's borders. Also, a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning author and journalist Sonia Nazario about the surge in immigrants from Central America.

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