Border & Immigration

Fifteen miles past the city limits of Juarez, an insane asylum serves as the last stop for a group of indigent and mentally ill people. It's called Vision en Accion, or Vision in Action, and it sits like a citadel in a filthy desert dotted with dumps and junkyards, in an area haunted by years of violence from the drug cartel wars that claimed more than 11,000 lives.

A few of the asylum's 120 residents live behind bars in tiny, solitary cement cells. You can hear them moaning or screaming at times.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

SAN ANTONIO — About 250 immigrant children were given an adult dose of a hepatitis A vaccine at a Texas detention facility where they were being held with their mothers, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials.

The vaccines were administered this week, but none of the children has been hospitalized or had any adverse reactions, ICE officials said Saturday.

ICE spokesman Richard Rocha said health care professionals would monitor the children over the next five days for any potential side effects, though none are expected.

A new government report recommends that the U.S. Border Patrol double its internal affairs investigators to focus on corruption and the alleged mistreatment of migrants along the Mexican border.

The interim report, written at the request of Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, focuses on three themes: rooting out corruption within the agency; reining in the unauthorized use of force by Border Patrol agents; and improving departmental transparency.

David Martin Davies

The Downtown San Antonio Greyhound bus station is a bustling place. Built in 1945 it’s the second oldest operating bus station in the Greyhound system. There is no escaping its vintage look even with the multiple flat screen TV’s on the deco style speckled walls.

On this Saturday afternoon there’s the familiar scene of departure.  Francesca, a woman from Guatemala and Freddie, her 9-year-old son, are trying to make sense of their bus ticket.

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas is the number one U.S. destination for refugees.  The decision to leave home for the journey is a tough choice.

--In the wake of police confrontations, more Texas police departments are buying body cameras for their officers.  

--A Texas company is a go-to source in the growing market for police body cameras.

--Mexicans who have been departed say it’s hard to earn the parole they need to fight their cases in the United States.

--Women make up only 25 percent of workers in the male dominated oil business. 

Pages