Border & Immigration

Fronteras

Kyrsten Sinema, who was homeless for a time growing up, is headed to Congress, and another Arizona lawmaker, Ann Kirkpatrick, is returning to Washington in January after sitting out a term. Some people returning to Mexico are still facing economic struggles in their home country. Also, we report Mexico has its own population of people living in the shadows.

Katie Euphrat / Fronteras

Authorities in Southern California are confronting the rise in maritime smuggling of illegal immigrants and drugs. If the nation plunges over the fiscal cliff, it would have an immeasurable impact on the border. Navajos have been especially vulnerable to questionable car sales tactics and Arizona school districts are grappling with a federal mandate to improve English language instruction.

Veronica Zaragovia / Fronteras

According to a recent survey, more Latinos support gay marriage, but young gay and lesbian Latinos still don't feel accepted. A dancer from Phoenix connects to her Jewish heritage late in life. Walking the Trail of Time, thinking about the age of the Grand Canyon. Hispanics in Phoenix celebrate Hanukkah.

Lorne Matalon / Marfa Public Radio

The Fronteras Desk: Some border residents are waiting for the opening of a formal border crossing linking Rio Grande Village inside Big Bend National Park and the Mexican riverside village of Boquillas; authorities in Tijuana have located two mass graves containing potentially hundreds of dissolved human remains; how one health provider is using telenovelas to educate Latinos about HIV; and finally, the holiday season has many families preparing for tamaladas.

Lorne Matalon

Some Mexican citizens hope the PRI's return to power in Mexico will bring stability to the country. A look at how the border city of Tijuana is trying to lure tourists by promoting a growing music scene, while more traditional tourist draws are still alive and kicking. Finally, Mezcal, tequila's cousin, is contributing to reverse migration to Mexico.

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