Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

From Texas Standard.

Much debris has been cleared out, but three months after Harvey’s landfall, the ecological damage is still being assessed. Not long after the storm clouds cleared, oyster and shrimp farmers lamented the hit to their livelihoods from extensive rains and runoff.

But researchers at the University of Houston at Clear Lake have been looking at the storm’s effect on other marine life, too – and they’ve discovered that bottlenose dolphins, have developed some puzzling ailments after the storm. Kristi Fazioli, a research associate with the Environmental Institute of Houston at the University of Houston Clear Lake, helps study this population.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

The state’s expanding population, coupled with more extreme flooding events and drought cycles, is creating short-term management challenges and long-term planning uncertainty. We rely on prevailing climate patterns to plan for development, agriculture, and ranching, but those patterns are changing.

Water quality was at the top of everyone’s mind at the eighth annual Water Forum sponsored by San Antonio Clean Technology Forum. Even before opening the program, several speakers cited the quality of San Antonio’s water. Andrew Sansom, who was awarded the Water for Life award for his work with the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, among other achievements, noted in accepting the award, “San Antonio a beacon of hope for the rest of the United States with respect to water.”

STP

When Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas coast the South Texas Project nuclear power plant was put through its toughest weather test since going online in 1988. After the storm, questions are being asked about the decisions made and public safety.

When Hurricane Harvey entered the Gulf of Mexico on August 23rd it quickly grew into a category 4 storm and the South Texas Project engaged its Severe Weather plan.

Ever wonder what happens when you recycle your milk jugs, paper and soda cans? And whether you’re recycling the right plastics?

Nashville Public Radio’s Emily Siner (@SinerSays) shares insight into how recycling works — and what happens if you’re not careful about what you throw into your recycling bin.

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