Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

Texas Lake Slowly Recovers From Drought

15 hours ago

It continues to rain today in South Central Texas, which was hit hard by devastating flooding this week. The heavy rains have brought an end to the extreme drought there, which began in 2010.

In September 2013, John Williams, who owns Thunderbird Lodge and Resort on Lake Buchanan in Central Texas, spoke with Here & Now. The lake had shrunk to about one-third capacity.

San Antonio River Foundation

There’s lots of buzz about plans for a new park overlooking the Mission Reach.  The $10 million plan for Confluence Park, to be situated at the confluence of the San Antonio River and San Pedro Creek, will focus on teaching responsible water use and landscaping practices.

Stuart Allen is the project manager.

“Well, it’s a 3-1/2 acre outdoor learning classroom. The intent of the project is to create a destination on the Riverwalk where students and river visitors alike can learn about native plant species and witness a large-scale water catchment system,” Allen said.

From Texas Standard:

It's been exactly one month and a day since a ghastly event down in Corpus Christi.

On that day, workers at the Texas State Aquarium applied a white powder to the tanks of two huge exhibits: the Islands of Steel and the flower garden. They were trying to treat an infestation of a potentially deadly flatworm that attaches itself to fish.

San Antonio River Authority

The San Antonio River Authority said it could take weeks to clean up Fiesta trash that made its way into the river after the festival was over.

Heavy downpours during and after the two-week party has left an unusually large amount of garbage along a stretch of the river bank. 

But SARA’s Steven Schauer said the trash in the river isn’t just related to Fiesta.

Nikodem Nijaki / Wikimedia Commons

MIAMI — With the killers hiding in the trees, heat-sensing drones are launched into the air. When their whereabouts are narrowed, the dogs are sent in. When it comes to protecting the world’s supply of guacamole, no weapon can be spared.

On subtropical farmland in South Florida, researchers are doing battle with the deadly fungus, laurel wilt, which is spread by a tiny beetle and has the potential to decimate Florida’s avocado crop. The hashtag they have adopted for their mission: #savetheguac.

“This is probably the biggest threat to the Florida avocado that’s ever been seen,” said Jonathan H. Crane, a tropical fruit crop specialist at the University of Florida.

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