Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

It's a free movie night for those interested in wildlife, especially on the San Antonio River! 

This evening is the San Antonio River Authority's Third Annual Environmental Film Fest in honor of National Rivers Month.
 

The river authority conducts efforts throughout the year to help residents and visitors learn about the importance of the ecosystem on the San Antonio River and the surrounding areas.

Nathan Cone / TPR

“If you can’t cook ‘em, eat ‘em, or shoot ‘em, what the heck good are they?” was the subtext of a panel discussion held on the campus of Texas Tech University-Junction on May 18, 2016. The Golden-cheeked Warbler, several species of mussels, and Monarch butterflies were all brought up in the context of conservation and concerns over development in the Texas Hill Country.

Eileen Pace / Texas Public Radio

Bexar County has signed an anti-pollution order that requires trucks and other heavy vehicles to stop idling their engines in the county.

The move is an answer to new Environmental Protection Agency rules that limit ozone pollution to less than 70 parts per billion.

County Commissioners Tuesday approved a Memorandum of Understanding with the Alamo Area Council of Governments and the City of San Antonio for a court order prohibiting heavy vehicles from leaving their engines on idle.

Twenty-four states are suing to block the Obama administration from implementing its new clean power regulations — the cornerstone of a promise that the United States will reduce greenhouse gas emissions to limit global warming. Those rules come out of the Paris Climate Accord, which Secretary of State John Kerry plans to sign on Friday.

The U.S. Geological Survey this week released a new earthquake hazard map that, for the first time, includes quakes resulting from man-made causes, rather than natural causes. Oklahoma tops the list of the states most vulnerable to human-induced quakes. Parts of it are now as earthquake-prone as California. Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti talks with Mark Petersen, chief of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project, about the most seismically active states.

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