Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

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 Anti-fracking activists took their concerns to the voters of Denton, Texas in the recent November general election and passed a city fracking ban. It went into effect on December first. But industry leaders and the Texas Rail Road Commission say that doesn’t matter. They say it’s still “drill baby drill” for Denton. The Texas Oil and Gas Association and the Texas General Land Commission are now suing Denton over the frack ban. Cathy McMullan is the president of Frack Free Denton.  

David Martin Davies

A new report released this week adds to the growing evidence that the chemicals associated with fracking and horizontal drilling could be a danger to reproductive health to animals and humans. The study was conducted by the Center for Environmental Health.  Susan C.

David Martin Davies

Sometime in November the one billionth barrel of oil was pumped out of the Eagle Ford Shale play – that’s according to the research firm Wood Mackenzie.

More than 70 percent of that production has occurred in the last two years.

The milestone comes at a time when oil prices are going through a steep drop. Right now a barrel of U.S. crude is going for under 70 dollars a barrel. And many in the industry have discussed plans to pull back on U.S. shale production.

Difficult decisions lie ahead as urban areas demand more water, rural areas experience loss of spring flow, and our region faces increased challenges brought by population growth and drought. Are Central Texas’ water planning processes on track to balance the needs of its rural and urban users and protect the natural water resources that sustain our ecologic and economic health?

San Antonio River Authority

Recent Rains have some of you thinking about fall in your garden and what you should do there. I've found a fascinating project that you didn’t even know you needed. It’s called a rain garden.

“A rain garden is a shallow depression that is placed in a position where it collects storm water runoff from areas where that runoff is concentrated; like rain gutters, or off a driveway, or a sidewalk.”

Lee Marlowe works with sustainable landscapes for the San Antonio River Authority.

“And you intercept that rain flow with a shallow depression.”

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