Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

Jack Morgan

As Texas slowly begins its cool-down, many people turn their thoughts toward landscaping in the fall and  winter.  Landscaping is tough work, but there are things you can do to make it easier, and also cheaper. How? Well, you need to go native.   

“Native Plant Week is a week that has been designated to make people more aware of using native plants in their landscape.”

Mary Moses is with Comal County’s Native Plant Society of Texas.

“Using Native Plants makes for a healthier habitat that supports wildlife. Bees…it just makes the earth more healthy.”

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

One San Antonio woman is relieved that her bee problem is finally gone. But Norma Ramon now knows not to call any more exterminators if honey bees invade her home. She'll call the "Bee Whisperer."

After months of honey bees building a hive that grew to at least 4 feet by 2 feet, 150,000 bees would not go away even after exterminators tried to kill them off.

"I had a couple of companies come out and work on it and they tried their best, they really did, and nothing happened," she said.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

OCI Solar Power announced Thursday that it has "flipped the switch" on 39 megawatts of solar power at the Alamo 4 project, making the newly completed solar farm just west of San Antonio operational.

OCI officials say the company is on track to bring an additional 145 megawatts of solar power to the state by the end of this year.

UHS

  University Health System Thursday accepted a check for half a million dollars in rebates for energy savings. It was the second large, commercial rebate announced this week.

George Hernandez, president and CEO of University Health System, said the new University Hospital Sky Tower is designed to use 20% less energy than a similar structure built to “normal” building codes.

Bexar County

  

It’s that time of year again, when taxing entities come up with new budgets and go to taxpayers with rate increases – or in some cases, decreases.

The San Antonio River Authority is one of those taxing entities and has set a new, lower tax rate for the next fiscal year, but it means a slight increase for most homeowners because of rising property values.

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