Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published in December 2015 and was republished with minor updates ahead of President Trump's decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement. Some of the information on approval by individual governments has been changed to reflect changes in status.

Since Scott Pruitt has taken the reigns of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency has rolled back regulations, scrubbed information on global warming from its website and dismissed members of a key science advisory board. But that isn’t enough for some climate change skeptics and fossil fuel advocates, who would like to see the EPA rescind its entire rationale for battling global warming.

President Trump has been trying to make good on his campaign promise to end what he calls his predecessor’s “war on coal,” vowing to make so-called “clean coal” plants that reduce carbon emissions a reality.

April Chavez / TPR

Invasive Arundo cane, Zebra Mussels, and Hydrilla are among a host of aquatic plants and animals that are not native to Texas and compete with our native animals and plants for food and space. Because introduced species lack natural enemies in our waterways, they can multiply and spread at an alarming rate, interfering with boat traffic, affecting water quality and quantity, and causing a range of other problems. 

Scientists from the U.S. and Mexico are teaming up to find out how the environment in the Gulf of Mexico is recovering from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. They’re examining satellite data from the Ixtoc oil spill in 1979 off the Mexican coast to see how the area near the Deepwater Horizon spill might look in the future. David Levin has our report.

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