Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

West Texas Site Wants Nation’s Spent Nuclear Fuel

Feb 11, 2015

Texas’ only radioactive waste dump wants to open its gates to tens of thousands of metric tons of spent nuclear reactor fuel now scattered across the country — a large expansion it is pitching as a temporary solution for a problem that has bedeviled federal policymakers for decades. 

Waste Control Specialists is seeking federal approval to temporarily store highly radioactive waste at its complex in Andrews County, northwest of Midland. 

Southern Methodist University seismologists have determined that the recent earthquakes that have rattled North Texas were concentrated along a two-mile line that indicates a fault from Irving into West Dallas.

Lower Colorado River Authority

Understanding moisture levels in the soil can help us better monitor droughts and manage floods.

The Lower Colorado River Authority has teamed up with the Jackson School of Geosciences at UT-Austin to collect soil moisture data.  It’s part of the Texas Soil Observation Network and NASA’s first Soil Moisture Active Passive mission or SMAP.

LCRA JOINS HISTORIC NASA MISSION TO MONITOR SOIL MOISTURE FROM SPACE

 

Network of Sensors to Help Monitor Droughts, Predict Floods

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

In May, San Antonians will have the opportunity to vote on whether to continue an aquifer protection program that collects one-eighth of a cent sales tax. After meeting on Wednesday for an initial discussion on the matter, on Thursday, the San Antonio City Council unanimously approved what will be propositions 1 & 2 in the upcoming municipal election.

Courtesy photo

  On Thursday, the San Antonio City Council will decide whether to ask voters to renew a sales tax for aquifer protection and park maintenance. This one-eighth of a cent sales tax could potentially have a host of uses.  

At the moment, the City of San Antonio uses most of the money collected from the sales tax to buy property in the Edwards Aquifer Recharge zone, which replenishes the area’s water supply. The tax was first approved in 2000, and 133,000 acres have been purchased so far through this money. 

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