Government

News about politics and government.

From Texas Standard:

The court upheld an affirmative action program at the University of Texas at Austin, ending a legal battle that started in 2008.

In Fisher v. the University of Texas, Abigail Fisher, a white student, sued the university for using race as a factor in college admissions. The decision sets a national precedent, at least for the time being.

David Martin Davies

 

To secede or not to secede?  That’s the question leaders of the Texas Nationalist Movement have for state elected officials following the United Kingdom’s narrow vote to leave the European Union.  While the fringe issue has become more of a mainstream conversation, state party leaders from both sides of the political aisle are still very much against the idea.

 

 

Justices on the U.S. Supreme Court in a narrow decision on Thursday decided that UT-Austin’s “use of race” in deciding its college admissions was constitutional.  It's a ruling that will forever impact the lives of prospective college students and the future of college admissions policies.

From Texas Standard:

Around this time last year, it appeared that Texas would play an outsized role in the 2016 race for the White House. A Texas senator was in the running, as well as a scion of a Texas political dynasty, a former business executive with Austin roots, the libertarian-leaning son of a longtime Texas congressman, and the longest-serving Texas governor in state history.

Ryan E. Poppe

Ahead of the 2017 Legislative session, lawmakers are looking at ways to boost college enrollment for working adults like military veterans, reaching those non-traditional students was discussed at the state capitol Tuesday.

The number of college students who also work has declined in recent years.  According to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, currently 39 percent of the state’s 3.8 million college students work full or part-time jobs while attending classes.

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