Government & Public Policy

News about politics and government.

Jan Ross / Texas Public Radio

Three leading candidates for San Antonio mayor tangled over relieving traffic gridlock, recruiting more police and the viability of the Vista Ridge water pipeline during a live debate Thursday on Texas Public Radio.  

Texas House of Representatives

Wednesday at the State Capitol, House lawmakers will vote on legislation aimed at overhauling how the state funds public education.  But while the bill provides schools an estimated $1.6 billion more in public education dollars, critics say it does very little to help  economically-disadvantaged students.

In 2016 the Texas Supreme Court settled what had been a four year long court battle between school districts and the state, stating that Texas’ system for funding public education was constitutional, but was  in need of top to bottom reforms.

Shelley Kofler / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, San Antonio voters will begin casting ballots in the May 6 race for mayor.  Texas Public Radio sat down with the leading mayoral candidates to find out more about their policy priorities.  We also asked them to take us to a location that reveals something about the values they would bring to the job.  We met District 8 Councilman Ron Nirenberg at a place where his public and personal priorities come together. (Watch the video profile below.)  

Ryan Poppe

It might be hard to believe, but Texas’s voting maps, those lines that decide where your representative district is and what seat you’re voting for, have been in flux for the past six years.

Large swaths of the state from Dallas to San Antonio out towards El Paso have had their congressional and state House districts disputed since 2011.  That’s when the state’s Republican-led legislature re-drew the maps. The Texas Constitution requires the state legislature re-draw these districts after each census, to make sure these geographic boundaries contain the same amount of people.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Lawmakers in the Texas Senate have taken up a bill that would allow judges and county clerks to deny marriages to same-sex couples based on their religious beliefs.  Opponents question whether the bill, if enacted, would violate a person’s constitutional rights and whose rights would they be violating?

The bill by State Senator Brian Birdwell, a Granbury Republican, would exempt county clerks from having to draw up a marriage license for a same-sex couple and county judges from performing them, if doing so violated their own religious beliefs.

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