Government & Public Policy

News about politics and government.

Gage Skidmore / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/5440392565

During his presidential campaign Donald Trump promised to kill a number of initiatives President Obama has put into place.  TPR’s Shelley Kofler talked with two political consultants – a Democrat and a Republican – about how Texas might be affected if President Trump follows through.  They don’t always agree on whether Texas would be better off or worse.  But they do agree the impact on our state could be significant. 

Ryan Poppe

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus of San Antonio says his top priorities for the upcoming legislative session include reforming school funding and foster care.

Straus laid out his legislative agenda Thursday before a packed crowd at the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Straus says this session, lawmakers will find balancing the state budget a lot more challenging because of lost oil and gas revenues, but he says that doesn’t mean money needed for public schools and foster care will be ignored. 

From Texas Standard:

When it comes to the electoral college, Texas is like most states: winner-take-all (only two states, Nebraska and Maine, aren't). So we're red and, if Democrats' dreams came true, we'd someday be blue.

Wendy Davis, a former gubernatorial candidate and former state senator from Dallas-Fort Worth, says she sees a possibility of a change in hue.

 


Ryan E. Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Texas’ longest serving governor and former state agriculture commissioner Rick Perry has announced he has been contacted by Donald Trump’s presidential transition team for a possible role in the administration.  

Perry on Twitter made the announcement saying that he had been contacted by the Trump transition team Wednesday morning.  Perry did not reference what role he was contacted for but did say, “Just got the call from Trump team, saddle up and ride.”  But Gene Hall with the Texas Farm Bureau says Perry would make a great addition as Trump agriculture secretary.

Ryan Poppe

Hillary Clinton came within single digits of Donald Trump in Texas, closer than any Democrat has come in winning this red state. But that was small concession for her Texas supporters who watched Trump win the presidency.

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