Government & Public Policy

News about politics and government.

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed a bill into law that lets police ask during routine stops whether someone is in the country legally and threatens sheriffs and police chiefs with jail if they don't cooperate with federal immigration agents.

The timing of the signing caught Democratic lawmakers off guard.

Abbott signed the bill Sunday night during a Facebook Live event with no advance public warning.

He signed the measure four days after both chambers of the Legislature approved it. The new law goes into effect Sept. 1.

Ryan Poppe

The cyber bullying bill known as David’s Law, named after Alamo Heights teen David Molak passed out of the Texas Senate on a unanimous vote Wednesday.   Despite some major changes to the bill, the Molak family is still happy with its passage.

Shelley D. Kofler / Texas Public Radio

The deadline is Friday for Congress and the President to approve a 2017 emergency budget, or the federal government will shut down.  A key issue: whether President Trump makes good on a promise to reject a budget that doesn’t include funding for a border wall.

Jan Ross / Texas Public Radio

Three leading candidates for San Antonio mayor tangled over relieving traffic gridlock, recruiting more police and the viability of the Vista Ridge water pipeline during a live debate Thursday on Texas Public Radio.  

Texas House of Representatives

Wednesday at the State Capitol, House lawmakers will vote on legislation aimed at overhauling how the state funds public education.  But while the bill provides schools an estimated $1.6 billion more in public education dollars, critics say it does very little to help  economically-disadvantaged students.

In 2016 the Texas Supreme Court settled what had been a four year long court battle between school districts and the state, stating that Texas’ system for funding public education was constitutional, but was  in need of top to bottom reforms.

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