Government & Public Policy

News about politics and government.

Shelley Kofler / Texas Public Radio

As San Antonio prepares to add more than 1.6 million new residents it holds the distinction of being the largest city in the country without a rail system to move them. 

This week Texas Public Radio’s Growing Pains Project is looking at options in a series of stories we’re calling, “Stuck Behind the Wheel.”

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Here are a few facts guaranteed to get your attention:  

The San Antonio area adds 146 new residents every day, and they’re bringing their cars.

A 50 minute drive today is expected to take 91 minutes in 2040.  

By then, 39 percent of our roadways will be severely congested all day long.

This week Texas Public Radio’s “Growing Pains” project takes a look at options for getting ahead of the traffic jam,  with a series of reports, “Stuck Behind The Wheel.” We start by looking at how San Antonio’s primary form of mass transit could be part of the solution. 

Ryan Poppe

Despite rallies being held outside the state capitol and some grumbling among those elected to cast a ballot, Trump received all but two of the Texas' 38 total electoral votes.

Those protesting the vote led rallies just below the Texas House chamber hoping those seated inside could hear their pleas that electors vote their conscious 

Inside the House chambers, electors spent 2 hours replacing four electors who had either resigned or would have been because of their jobs as federal and county employees

From Texas Standard:

Capitol Hill is quiet this time of year. Congress is out of session. All the senators and representatives have scattered to their respective districts, except the U.S. House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee. The committee’s leader, U.S. Rep. Kevin Brady from Texas (R-Woodlands), called lawmakers back to Washington to map out the imminent repeal of the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare.

Texas State University

The president of Texas State University says the San Marcos campus will not become a sanctuary campus. The idea was part of a growing statewide movement aimed at protecting undocumented students who are fearful about some of the promises made by incoming President Donald Trump.

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