Government & Public Policy

News about politics and government.

Ryan Poppe

It might be hard to believe, but Texas’s voting maps, those lines that decide where your representative district is and what seat you’re voting for, have been in flux for the past six years.

Large swaths of the state from Dallas to San Antonio out towards El Paso have had their congressional and state House districts disputed since 2011.  That’s when the state’s Republican-led legislature re-drew the maps. The Texas Constitution requires the state legislature re-draw these districts after each census, to make sure these geographic boundaries contain the same amount of people.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Lawmakers in the Texas Senate have taken up a bill that would allow judges and county clerks to deny marriages to same-sex couples based on their religious beliefs.  Opponents question whether the bill, if enacted, would violate a person’s constitutional rights and whose rights would they be violating?

The bill by State Senator Brian Birdwell, a Granbury Republican, would exempt county clerks from having to draw up a marriage license for a same-sex couple and county judges from performing them, if doing so violated their own religious beliefs.

From Texas Standard:

It's possible another billionaire who speaks his mind, is no stranger to TV, and has ideas about running the country could be the next President of the United States. Texas Monthly's Skip Hollandsworth poses the question in an article about Texan Mark Cuban, "Cuban Revolution".

Ryan Poppe

A bill that would create private school choice programs by allowing state funds to be used on private school education has passed out of the Texas Senate Thursday and on to the House. Some of the biggest concerns about the Republican-led bill came from other Republicans.

State Sen. Larry Taylor made several changes to his original bill aimed at creating private school choice programs in Texas. One change decreases the overall amount of state funds that fuel the bill’s Education Savings Accounts and tax-credit scholarships.

Ryan Poppe

Lawmakers in the Texas Senate have passed a two-year budget that would require local property owners to pay a bigger chunk of the public education tab.  It's a budget that seems on a direct collision course with House's budget.

Pages