Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Today is the second day in a military hearing for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl and Bergdahl’s attorneys will be calling their witnesses. Yesterday three of Bergdahl’s commanders testified that Bergdahl  placed a great strain on other soldiers when he left his post in Afghanistan in 2009. 


On  Thursday, prosecutors called Bergdahl’s commanders to the stand.  Captain John Billings testified that Bergdahl was an outstanding soldier before he left this post.



  Today, an Army investigator in San Antonio begins hearing evidence against Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl. Bergdahl left his post in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held by the Taliban for five years. In a military town like San Antonio service members appear to have little sympathy for Bergdahl.

In 2009, Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl left his outpost in Afghanistan and was held captive by the Taliban for five years. Last year he was released when the Obama Administration exchanged five Taliban members for Bergdahl.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The U.S. Army Special Forces Command allowed a closer look into an unconventional warfare exercise staged at Camp Bullis Tuesday night. The training is in conjunction with other exercises across the Southwest that some know as Jade Helm. Although a scheduled paratrooper jump did not happen due to safety issues, media outlets attending were given insight into the training.



A new program has started in San Antonio that provides free rides to military veterans and their spouses.  It’s called “Alamo Call-A-Ride 4 Vets” and is run by the Alamo Area Council of Governments through a $300,000 grant from the Texas Veterans Commission.

All veterans with an honorable discharge are eligible.

“The great thing about the program is it’s available to anyone who served in the military of any age. They don’t have to be disabled and they don’t have to have some income limit or something like that,” said AACOG Special Projects Manager Siena Lindemann.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Army confirmed Thursday that it will cut 40,000 troops at several domestic bases over the next two years in a cost-saving move. If the White House and Congress are unable to avert another round of sequestration cuts, the troop reductions could be even deeper, according to Army officials.