Military

TPR/NPR's coverage of Military and Veterans' issues. The Military Desk at Texas Public Radio is made possible in part by Baird Foundation Repair.

For specific stories from the American Homefront Project, see also this special section, archived at this link.

From Texas Standard:

Pentagon officials have undertaken a new policy that seeks to get rid of non-deployable military members. Is it a move to maintain a leaner, meaner fighting force? Or is the military simply not accounting for thousands of support personnel?

The Trump Administration wants to grow the Army substantially, even as potential recruits get harder to find. That's putting more pressure on recruiters than they've seen in years.

Octavia Harris visits the Texas Public Radio studio.
Carson Frame / TPR News

There are over 2.2 million women veterans in the U.S., and about 37,000 in San Antonio alone. Many seek care through the VA Health System. In January, a local veteran named Octavia Harris was tapped to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs' Advisory Committee on Women Veterans. She'll have the ear of VA Secretary David Shulkin for the next two years, and be able to offer input on policies that affect healthcare for women veterans nationwide.  

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

The average military family moves every two to three years. Their household goods are supposed to follow them, but it doesn’t always pan out that way. Some military families report that their possessions were lost, damaged, or stolen during moves — and they say the military doesn't do much to help.

 


Photo courtesy of UT Health San Antonio

Researchers with University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio co-authored a groundbreaking study on post-traumatic stress disorder published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study found a common therapy proven effective for civilians also works for service members with combat PTSD.


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