Military

Eileen Pace

Thirty members of a specialized infectious disease team have completed a round of training at Fort Sam Houston. The military team, organized by the Department of Defense to assist in domestic Ebola cases, trained in the specifics of using hazmat-style suits, which will protect them from exposure to the virus.

A technician sprays a saccharin-based solution toward the face mask of a member of the Ebola go team to make sure the seal on the mask is properly seated. Other members of the team practice drawing blood while wearing three pairs of rubber gloves.

U.S. Army

  

A team of military medical specialists is in San Antonio to begin Ebola containment training today at Fort Sam Houston.

The team, whose creation was ordered over the weekend by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, will prepare to assist civilian medical professionals in case of another report of Ebola in the U.S.

U.S. Northern Command brought together 20 nurses, five doctors, and five trainers from installations around the country to become the military’s first domestic support team for quick response in Ebola cases.

USAF

  

The UT Health Science Center has established a special institute within the research center to integrate military and civilian studies for the benefit of members of the military as well as the local civilian community.

The Military Health Institute will lead innovative medical research, health education and clinical care – working with the military toward improving the health of active duty military personnel, veterans and their families.

San Antonio Sports

On a mid-afternoon at Mission Concepción Sports Park, about 50 wounded warriors gathered in the gymnasium to compete in an air rifle competition that is part of this year's Valor Games.

Some traveled hundreds of miles to get to this year’s Valor Games, like Edward Afanador, who lives in New Jersey.

“The camaraderie here is just incredible. It’s a great time. There are guys here that we met at the VA Wheelchair Games last August in Philadelphia. You get a chance to really bond and make lifetime friendships," Afandaor said.

Over 5,000 Americans have died fighting in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. And, over the past 12 years, more than 2,000 soldiers have committed suicide.

One military family experienced both of those horrors — losing one son in combat and one to suicide. Journalist Yochi Dreazen's new book, The Invisible Front: Love And Loss In An Era of Endless War, tells the true story of the Graham family and two events that would forever change the very fabric of their world.

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