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Garland Police Chief: FBI Memo Wouldn’t Have Changed Response

May 11, 2015
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GARLAND — Officers protecting a controversial Prophet Muhammad cartoon contest did not know about an FBI memo sent to authorities in Texas beforehand that contained information about one of two gunmen who ultimately attempted to attack the event, but the details would not have changed their response, Garland’s police chief said Monday.

Joey Palacios / TPR News

AUSTIN — Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has signed a bill that would allow Texas high school students to fail two high-stakes exams and still graduate. It is effective immediately.

Abbott said Monday that the state “must protect” students from what he called evolving testing standards. “While it is critical that the state appropriately holds public schools and districts accountable for delivering the best possible education, we must protect Texas students from being penalized as a result of evolving testing standards,” he said in a statement. 

About 28,000 students in the class of 2015 still must pass one or more of the five state exams in U.S. history, biology, algebra I, English I and English II required to graduate. Of those who need to retake exams, about half must retake more than one.

Source: http://www.clarkprosecutor.org

AUSTIN — The identity of execution drug makers for the nation’s busiest death chamber would remain confidential under a bill passed by the Texas Senate.

The Republican-controlled Senate approved the measure Monday, a day before a 32-year-old Houston man was scheduled to become the seventh convicted killer executed in Texas this year.

An ongoing court challenge already prohibits Texas from disclosing where the state buys execution drugs.

That ruling came after manufacturers reported being threatened by death penalty opponents.

Momentum is now building to have Republican Gov. Greg Abbott sign a law that would permanently keep the names of execution drug suppliers under wraps.

Even the lawyers for condemned inmates wouldn’t know the supplier.

Clemed / CC

AUSTIN — The Texas Senate has voted to allow home school students to participate in public school athletics and extracurricular activities statewide — advancing the so-called “Tim Tebow bill.”

Plano Republican Sen. Van Taylor's proposal sanctions home school participation in University Interscholastic League events, which are currently only open to public school students.

Monday’s Senate approval sends the measure to the House. It’s similar to legislation that has advanced in other states.

Supporters point to Tebow, who played high school football in Florida while being home-schooled. He later won the Heisman Trophy at the University of Florida.

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick oversees the Senate and has likened expanding UIL participation to the 1960s civil rights movement.

Isaac Chavez

The Youth Orchestras of San Antonio join forces this weekend with other arts organizations to take on Carmina Burana. To find out more I spoke to YOSA’s Troy Peters.

Carmina Burana is this massive, epic piece of music for chorus and orchestra," Peters says. "It opens with some of the most famous music in classical music. And it’s just thrilling music from start to finish.” Carmina Burana’s origins are quite unusual.

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