Heated Abortion Debate In Texas House Affects Health Agency Bill

Apr 24, 2015
Wikipedia Commons

Debate on legislation to re-evaluate a state health agency morphed into a fight over abortion in the Texas House on Thursday, and the bill was pulled down after a pair of anti-abortion amendments were added to the bill over the author’s objections. 

The amendments, authored by state Rep. Matt Schaefer, R-Tyler, included one that would ban abortions of fetuses with genetic abnormalities after 20 weeks. Democrats and the bill’s author, state Rep. Four Price, R-Amarillo, had objected, complaining the amendments weren’t relevant to the bill. 

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

If you asked Tommy Adkisson where to go to have a good time, he’d probably take you on a stroll through his neighborhood.  As part of our ongoing series of reports on San Antonio’s leading mayoral candidates, we took Adkisson up on the offer of a stroll and had a candid conversation about the candidate’s priorities.

(Video by NowCastSA is below)

Who is today's Birthday Bard? Why, it's William Shakespeare! In truth, his birth date is rather hazy. Nevertheless, April 23, 1564, is when the BBC celebrates it, and that's good enough for me. However, to keep all bases covered, his baptism record shows the date April 26th on it.

One of the San Antonio Express-News images up for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize. See more at
Bob Owen Courtesy San Antonio Express-News

War, crime, drought, poverty have been represented strongly in journalism for generations.

They take up column inches and broadcast minutes. But while well-explained and intellectually understood, words often fall short in translating the full meaning of these and many other issues. The power of photographs to communicate the desperation of poverty, the fear of crime, the complexity of war, and the impact of the news on people and the environment is incalculable. 

Richard Morgan / Fronteras

PHOENIX — There won’t be nearly as many immigrant children who cross the border on their own this summer as there were last year, top officials say.

Daniel Ragsdale, deputy director for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said authorities expect far fewer migrant children and families than the influx last year that gained worldwide attention and left Border Patrol agents unable to process so many people. “I’m happy to say all the work we’ve done last year is bearing fruit,” Ragsdale said.

Ronald D. Vitiello, the Border Patrol’s deputy chief, agreed. “This year is far better off than last year,” he said.