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San Antonio River Authority

Bexar County has put aside $125 million to completely re-do a two-mile stretch of downtown’s San Pedro Creek. I've been looking at the plan in detail, and it is  pretty amazing. Currently the creek is a concrete drainage ditch, but what designers and engineers have imagined is something that looks a bit like a narrower Museum Reach.

The original reasoning for the project is flood control and water quality improvements; both to be accomplished through an underground overflow tunnel, with the added cleansing benefit that re-circulated water is pumped from it.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Difficulties in finding a way to fund the state’s Texas Windstorm Insurance Association and a number of lawsuits has caused Texas Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst to ask a legislative committee to study what shutting the state agency down would look like. 

Dewhurst told the Senate’s Committee on Business and Commerce that the state should no longer be in the insurance business.  

“We always talk about we shouldn’t be competing with the private sector," Dewhurst said. "We’re competing with the private sector; we’re operating a $77 billion insurance company and that scares me.”

Paul Flahive, Texas Public Radio

Today the city of San Antonio takes two payday lenders to court for violating the ordinance it passed two years ago to regulate the industry " in an effort to reduce against abusive and predatory lending practices."

The ordinance includes limiting the percentage rate of the loan to the income of the lendee, limiting the number of rollovers a person can take and requiring the contract be written in a language the borrower can understand, among other things. 

A state legislator that has joined Texas Gov. Rick Perry during his Asian Economic Development Trip said investors from China and Japan are poised to provide the private funds needed to grow the state’s economy and fulfill some of its infrastructure needs.

State Rep. Jason Villalba, R-Dallas, said Perry asked him to join him in Beijing to meet with hundreds of Chinese investors that are interested in growing the Texas economy by either providing capital for existing projects or bringing business to the state.

  In the really old days, they were called pictographs; later they were called emoticons. Now, though, they’re called emojis, a new word originating in Japan for those smiley-face, thumbs-up and I-heart-you icons all over electronic devices. Emojis now include airplanes, jack-o-lanterns, kittens and just about every other animal – or fruit or facial expression – that one can imagine.

So why not use them in medicine?

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