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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Governors in Kansas and Texas say they will join Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s lawsuit against the Obama Administration, alleging that federal officials are coercing the state to expand Medicaid in order to get $1 billion in federal hospital funds.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback said Monday he plans to file an amicus brief in a fight to protect states’ right to make their own decisions. Scott said Monday that he’d talked with Gov. Greg Abbott, who also pledged support.

Tropical Islands Resort / CC

BRAND, Germany — It rose on a former Soviet airfield south of Berlin, a towering hangar bigger than a dozen football fields where ambitious entrepreneurs planned to revive Germany’s zeppelin industry.

That dream died in 2002 when funding ran out, but the building was reborn as a massive popular tropical theme park, complete with a rainforest, a beach, waterslides and more than 850 hotel beds.

On Monday, a delegation from Texas toured the facility to see if lessons learned by the Germans can be applied to converting the Houston Astrodome, the world’s first multi-purposed domed stadium, which hasn’t been home to a sports team since 1999 and has been closed to all events since 2009.

State senators are wrangling over a bill that would protect clergy who don’t want to perform same-sex marriages.

The author of the bill is Sen. Craig Estes, a Republican from Wichita Falls. He says some religious leaders in Texas oppose gay marriage. They’re waiting to see how the U.S. Supreme Court rules on the issue in June, and they want to make sure they won’t be legally required to marry same-sex couples.

AUSTIN — The Texas Senate has voted to scrap the state’s high school steroids testing program after more than 60,000 tests caught just a handful of cheaters since 2007.

Texas has spent more than $10 million since launching the program. But the high cost, extremely low rate of catching steroids users and criticism of testing methods has prompted lawmakers to abandon an effort once praised as a leader for the country.

DALLAS — The family of the only person to die of Ebola in the U.S. says it is underwhelmed by a Dallas hospital’s efforts to fulfill a settlement agreement to combat the disease in Africa.

Texas Health Presbyterian Dallas on Monday announced it donated $125,000 toward a scholarship to train doctors and nurses in Liberia. Hospital spokesman Wendell Watson says the donation fulfills a settlement agreement with Thomas Eric Duncan’s family that included an undisclosed payout.

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