Shots - Health News
2:03 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Selling Health Care To California's Latinos Got Lost In Translation

Covered California

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 6:59 am

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Around the Nation
2:01 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Growing An Urban Neighborhood, One Store At A Time

Communications store owner Donny Seto (right) says other business owners shouldn't be so hesitant to set up in the Congress Heights neighborhood of Washington, D.C.
Leah Binkovitz NPR

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 10:30 am

Across the country, communities stranded in food and retail deserts are asking how they can enjoy the bounty afforded to other urban centers. One Washington, D.C., community thinks it might have an answer.

Just a 10-minute drive south of the U.S. Capitol, across the Anacostia River, sits Congress Heights. The Southeast D.C. neighborhood is less than 2 miles long and home to more than 8,000 people, many in single-family houses. But if you're looking for a sit-down meal, options are scarce.

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The Two-Way
5:15 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Bin Laden's Brother-In-Law Goes On Trial In Manhattan

In this courtroom drawing, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, center, listens to a translator, in U.S. federal court on Wednesday in New York.
Elizabeth Williams AP

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, the son-in-law of Osama bin Laden who prosecutors say became a mouthpiece for al-Qaida in the days after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, faced a jury for the first time on Wednesday in a Manhattan federal courtroom.

On the first day of the trial, jurors were shown a photo that prosecutors said was Abu Ghaith, a Kuwaiti, sitting side-by-side with Osama bin Laden the day after the devastating attacks on the World Trade Center towers and the Pentagon.

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2014 Primary Election
5:10 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Wolff Beats Adkisson In County Judge Primary, Faces Soules In General Election

Eileen Pace TPR News

Going into the election, the quest for the Democratic nomination for Bexar County judge appeared to be a tight contest. But the mood of each camp told the story as soon as early voting results came in.

Even though the candidates knew the South Side of San Antonio is traditionally an election-day voting crowd, each seemed convinced of the outcome moments after the early vote tabulations crossed the computer screen at 7:15. 

"What a relief," said Nelson Wolff, the incumbent who was challenged for the Democratic nomination by Precinct 4 County Commissioner Tommy Adkisson.

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Arts & Culture
5:03 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Andy Warhol's Athlete Series Comes to SAMA

Muhammad Ali, 1978.
Collection of Richard Weisman

A new exhibition at the San Antonio Museum of Art is emblematic of another era -- an era before athletes were the superheroes they are now. That new Andy Warhol exhibit starts with a man named Richard Weisman, who said he was a very close friend of iconic artist.

Weisman is a perceptive man and in the late 70s he figured this out:

“The world of art and the world of sports don’t necessarily mix that well,” he said.

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It's All Politics
4:59 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Bill Clinton, Party-Builder In Chief

Former President Clinton was the one modern Democratic president who focused on building up his party, an effort he continues today.
Luke Sharrett Getty Images

President Obama may be the standard bearer of the Democratic Party, but his unpopularity in some parts of the country means there are certain places on the campaign trail where it's best for him to stay away.

Enter former President Clinton, who can go where Obama fears to tread.

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Shots - Health News
4:14 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick

Current water-filtering technology is costly, but MIT scientists are testing a simpler and cheaper method that uses wood from white pine trees.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:00 am

Removing all the dangerous bacteria from drinking water would have enormous health benefits for people around the world.

The technologies exist for doing that, but there's a problem: cost.

Now a scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology thinks he's on to a much less expensive way to clean up water.

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The Salt
3:59 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Beer As A Post-Workout Recovery Drink? Not As Crazy As It Sounds

An ad for Vampt's Lean Machine "recovery ale," which will be marketed as a sports drink later this year, if funding allows. Researchers say drinking beer after working out has some advantages, but there are big caveats.
Courtesy of VAMPT

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 2:49 pm

There may be some good news brewing for fitness and beer enthusiasts: Somewhere in the north, a Canadian beverage company has concocted a low-alcohol, protein-packed "fit beer" that is expected to be marketed as a sports drink later this year, if funding allows.

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Week of March 2 - March 8
3:53 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

This Week in the Civil War - 780

Jefferson Davis in a March 7, 1864 letter to General James Longstreet at Greeneville, Tennessee wrote, “It is needless to point out to you the value of a successful movement into Tennessee and Kentucky, and the importance—I may say necessity—of our taking the initiative.” 

Davis was right in his desire for his generals to seek victories against the Union armies.  However, he did not fully understand at the time that the high water mark of Confederate military action was in the past rather than in the present or future. 

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It's All Politics
3:22 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Senate Democrats Defect On Obama Civil Rights Nominee

Debo Adegbile, special counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, speaks with the media outside the Supreme Court in Feb. 2013 after presenting arguments in the Shelby County, Ala., v. Holder voting rights case.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 7:42 pm

In a stinging blow to the Obama administration, seven Senate Democrats joined with Republicans Wednesday to block one of the president's key civil rights nominees.

The 47 to 52 vote marked the first defeat of a Democratic nominee since lawmakers changed Senate rules to make it easier to push through judges and executive branch candidates. And it came after a clash that pit powerful law enforcement interests against the civil rights community.

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