Around the Nation
4:39 am
Sat November 30, 2013

From Lab To Lectern, Scientists Learn To Turn On the Charm

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 5:15 pm

About 20 scientists are clustered in a cramped conference room in San Diego, one of the country's science hubs, but they aren't there to pore over their latest research. Instead, this is a meeting of BioToasters — a chapter of the public speaking organization Toastmasters, geared specifically toward scientists.

"For a typical scientist, they will spend a lot of time at the bench, so they're doing a lot of maybe calculations or lab work where they're not interacting directly from person to person," says BioToasters President Zackary Prag, a lab equipment sales rep.

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Parallels
4:38 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Crashing An Afghan Wedding: No Toasts But Lots Of Cheesy Music

Afghans hold large, expensive weddings, even those involving families of modest means. More than 600 people attended this recent marriage at a large wedding hall in Kabul.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 5:17 pm

Afghanistan may be one of the world's poorest countries, but weddings are still a big — and expensive — deal. On most weekends, Kabul's glitzy and somewhat garish wedding halls are packed with people celebrating nuptials.

One of them is the Uranos Palace complex. On the night I attended my first Afghan wedding, all three of its halls were overflowing. I was one of two foreigners in a room of about 200 men. The female guests sat on the other side of a 7-foot-high divider in the middle of the hall.

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Environment
4:37 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Tech Leaders, Economists Split Over Clean Energy's Prospects

Andres Quiroz, an installer for Stellar Solar, carries a solar panel during installation at a home in Encinitas, Calif.
Sam Hodgson Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 12:17 pm

There is a broad scientific consensus that to keep global warming in check, we need to phase out 80 percent of all oil, coal and natural gas by midcentury. President Obama has set a nonbinding target to do precisely that.

There are technologists who say this national goal is well within reach, but there are also economists who are quite pessimistic about those prospects. And you can find this range of opinion on the University of California, Berkeley campus.

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Alt.Latino
10:54 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

La Mera Mera: New Music From Peru, Colombia, Ecuador And More

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Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 8:03 am

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

U.S. Apologizes For Airstrike That Killed Afghan Child

Afghan President Hamid Karzai addresses the Loya Jirga on Sunday. Karzai expressed anger at an airstrike Thursday that killed a child, saying it could imperil a security agreement with the U.S. The U.S.-led international force apologized on Friday for the killing.
Massoud Hossaini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 4:17 pm

The U.S.-led international coalition in Afghanistan is apologizing for an airstrike that killed a 2-year-old, a death that Afghan President Hamid Karzai said imperils a long-term security agreement between the two countries.

The International Security Assistance Force said it carried out an airstrike Thursday on a militant riding a motorbike in Helmand Province. The child was also killed, and two women were injured in the attack.

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Week of Nov. 24 - Nov. 30
2:37 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

This Week in the Civil War - 712

On Saturday, November 28, 1863 in the western theatre Sherman was ordered to Knoxville, Tennessee to assist Burnside’s forces against  Longstreet’s Confederates.  On the same day Braxton Bragg telegraphed Richmond from Dalton, Georgia, acknowledging “I deem to due to the cause and to myself to ask for relief from command and investigation into the causes of the [Chattanooga] defeat.” 

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Top Amazon Reviewers Get Big Perks

Michael Erb gets thousands of dollars in free merchandise for being a top reviewer on Amazon. (Michael E Mobile Sound/Facebook)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:20 pm

Whether or not you read them, the customer reviews on retailers’ websites have enormous value, mostly for the company.

The more a product is reviewed, the more likely it is that people will buy that product and the more money companies such as Amazon make.

So the benefits of online reviews are obvious for retailers, but what’s in it for the most prolific reviewers? For Amazon’s top reviewers, the benefits are tangible.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Independent Retailers Look To 'Small Business Saturday'

Lizzibeth in Milwaukee is one of many small businesses hoping to capitalize on the holiday season. (LaToya Dennis/WUWM)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:20 pm

Small, locally-owned retailers are also trying to cash in the holiday shopping rush with Small Business Saturday tomorrow.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, LaToya Dennis of WUWM in Milwaukee reports that small players can face a challenge that big box stores don’t have to worry about: marketing.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

'Tis The Season For New Cookbooks

(Hideya Hamano/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:55 pm

Cookbooks abound this time of year, just in time for holiday feasting.

Among the stacks on NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey‘s desk are cookbooks for slow cooking, gluten-free baked goods and practical books for fresh and simple foods.

She shares some of the best ones with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

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Peter Payette is the News Director at Interlochen Public Radio, the broadcast service owned and operated by the Interlochen Center for the Arts. He manages the news department, has hosted its weekly program Points North, and reports on a wide range of issues critical to the culture and economy of northern Michigan. His work has been featured on NPR and Michigan Radio and in Traverse Magazine. He teaches radio storytelling to students at the Interlochen Arts Academy. He is also working on a book about the use of aquaculture to manage Great Lakes fisheries, particularly the use of salmon from the Pacific Ocean to create a sport fishery in the 1960s.

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