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Goats and Soda
8:55 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Time To 'Girl Up:' Teens Fight For The Right To School, Soccer

Watch out Congress: Girl Up activists came to the nation's capital in June to lobby for issues affecting girls in the developing world. From left, Alexandrea Leone (Ewing, N.J.), Grace Peters (Flemington, N.J.), Aklesiya Dejene (Chicago, Ill.), Isabella Gonzalez and Erika Hiple (Stockton, N.J.)
Ryan Kellman NPR

They are seven girls in their teens and early 20s, awake at the ungodly (for them) hour of 8:30 a.m. With sleepy smiles, the young women slip into a windowless conference room in a Washington, D.C. hotel to talk to a reporter, who's curious to find out: What's it like to be a global girl activist?

And they're the experts. They're supporters of the U.N. Foundation group called Girl Up, which has the manifesto of "uniting girls to change the world."

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Tue July 29, 2014

White House Says Delayed Action On Climate Change Could Cost Billions

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:42 am

In a report issued on Tuesday, the White House warned that the cost of inaction when it comes to climate change outweighs the cost of implementing more stringent regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.

Here's how Time boils down the White House's argument:

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Shots - Health News
6:47 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Athletes Should Fear The Heat More Than The Heart Attack

Some marathons are warning runners when conditions increase the risk of heat stroke.
iStockphoto

When a runner's heart stops during a marathon, it gets a lot of press – even though it's actually a pretty rare event. A more common killer among runners, and a condition that needs more prevention efforts, is heat stroke, according to a study by Israeli researchers.

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Tue July 29, 2014

China Puts Former Top Communist Party Official Under Investigation

Zhou Yongkang, then Chinese Communist Party Politburo Standing Committee member in charge of security, attends a plenary session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China in 2012.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:43 am

The central committee of China's communist party placed a former top-ranking official under investigation on Tuesday.

China's state-run news agency Xinhua reports Zhou Yongkang is accused of "serious disciplinary violation."

Reporting from Beijing, NPR's Anthony Kuhn tells our Newscast unit that while there is no specificity to those charges from the party, this usually implies that criminal corruption charges will follow.

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Health
6:35 am
Tue July 29, 2014

A Compromise Deal On Overhauling The VA, But Will It Pass?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
6:35 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Sit Down, Plug In And Travel The World Through Sound

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
6:20 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Photos From Syria May Show 'Killing On An Industrial Scale'

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
6:20 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Israel's Prime Minister Says Gaza War Could Be 'Prolonged'

In the morgue of Gaza's Shifa hospital, Palestinian relatives mourn following an explosion that reportedly killed at least 10 people Monday, nine of them said to be children.
Adel Hana AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:43 am

Despite calls from the United Nations for a cease-fire, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned his country to prepare for a "prolonged" war.

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U.S.
6:00 am
Tue July 29, 2014

N.H. Promises To Let D.C. Residents Buy Booze There

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
5:11 am
Tue July 29, 2014

For Iraqis In Crisis, Dividing The Country Seems A Poor Solution

A volunteer at a Christian church in Qosh, Iraq, loads aid onto a handcart Monday for delivery to displaced Shiites who are sheltering there.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:35 am

The muscular farmer sits in the basement kindergarten of the church, perched on a tiny chair intended for a child. He and his family are spending the holiday here, after being forced to flee from extremists.

"Our village is more than 300 years old," Ahmed Ali says of Shreikhan, near Mosul, "and we never had any such problems."

For most Muslims around the world, Eid is a time for gifts, feasts and visiting relatives. But for him and others in a militant-controlled swath of northwest Iraq, it's a strange and unhappy holiday.

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