NPR National Stories

Pages

NPR Story
3:05 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

A Look At The Stock Market 50 Years Ago Today

Wire copy from the New York General Desk of The Associated Press on the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination. (AP)

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:24 pm

Early trading was mixed today on Wall Street, after the the Dow Jones industrial average closed at an all time high yesterday.

The Dow closed above 16,000 after the government reported encouraging news about the job market.

Marty Schenker joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss what happened to the stock market 50 years ago today, when news broke of President Kennedy’s death.

Read more
NPR Story
3:05 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Sen. Hoeven: Senate Rule Change Is 'Power Grab'

Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) voted against the so-called "nuclear option" that would make it harder for the minority party to block some presidential nominations. It passed along expected partisan lines. (hoeven.senate.gov)

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:24 pm

The Senate voted yesterday to invoke the “nuclear option.” Today we take a look at the potential fallout from that move.

The rule change overturned the requirement for a 60-vote majority to stop a filibuster of most presidential nominees. Now a filibuster can be stopped with a simple majority of 51.

Jim Manley a former Democratic aide compared the move to opening a Pandora’s box. Senator Mitch McConnell said “you may regret this a lot sooner than you think.”

Read more
NPR Story
3:05 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

What Does The Future Hold For Russia's Longest-Serving Political Prisoner?

Mikhail Khodorkovsky, a Russian former oil billionaire, was imprisoned on charges of tax evasion and fraud. He is considered the best known Russian political prisoner. (khodorkovsky.com)

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:24 pm

Will political amnesty, proposed by the Kremlin’s Human Rights Council, free former oil billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky from prison, 10 years after he was jailed on charges of fraud and tax evasion?

Or will new charges be leveled that could keep the founder of the Yukos Oil Company in jail for years to come?

Read more
Science
2:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

The Science Behind Hard Hits And Touchdowns

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 3:18 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Grammy award-winning musician Esperanza Spalding gets political with her new song. We'll talk to her about her battle to close Guantanamo in just a few minutes.

Read more
The Salt
2:16 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Why Slather This Spinach Field In Poop? It's All For Science

University of California, Davis food safety field scientists Michele Jay-Russell, Paula Kahn-Rivadeneira, Anna Zwieniecka, Navreen Pandher and Peiman Aminabadi celebrate the first day of their experiment testing E. coli survival in soil.
Courtesy of Fhon Saharuetai

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 4:06 pm

Why are these scientists in hazmat suits smiling? They're standing in a field that they are about to spread with raw manure — four different kinds of raw manure, to be exact.

Read more
Texas Matters
2:11 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Inside Parkland Hospital & Aboard Air Force One the Day JFK Was Killed

The front page of The Dallas Times Herald after President Kennedy's assassination, on display by the Texas State Archives and Library Commission.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon, KUT News

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 7:21 pm

Before that afternoon fifty years ago, neither Sid Davis nor Julian Read could have expected what they’d be called upon to do – much less that they’d both be eyewitnesses to history. 

Davis was a young radio reporter based in Washington D.C.

Read was on the other side of the journalistic fence, serving as press aide for Texas Gov. John Connally.

But they were both on a press bus in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963 – the day President John F. Kennedy was shot.

After 50 years of virtual silence, Austinite Julian Read recently opened up to KUT about his experience that day. 

Read more
The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

$1.1 Million Dune Buggy: Youabian Makes Splash At LA Car Show

The Youabian Puma has turned heads at the LA Auto Show, where attendees have been startled by its 20-foot length and unusual design.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:54 pm

Some cars are meant to be beautiful; some cars are meant to serve a purpose. The makers of the Youabian Puma say their car was created with one goal: "to stand out and be unique." And that's what they've done, as dozens of howling headlines attest.

Read more
The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
1:50 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

How Live TV Helped America Mourn The Loss Of JFK

During JFK's funeral, live TV coverage helped make John-John Kennedy's salute an indelible image of American history.
Keystone Getty Images

Read more
The Salt
1:17 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

This Is What America's School Lunches Really Look Like

Courtesy of DoSomething.org

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 11:08 am

School lunch has never been the stuff of foodie dreams. I'm still haunted by the memory of my elementary school cafeteria's "brain pizza" – a lumpy oval thing topped with fleshy white strips of barely melted mozzarella that clumped together like neurons.

And it looks like America's school cafeterias are still turning out the culinary abominations, judging by the images on Fed Up, a fascinating online project showcasing school lunch photos submitted by students across the country.

Read more
Parallels
1:06 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

British Case Points To Hidden Nature Of Modern Slavery

A pedestrian walks along Lambeth Road in south London on Friday. Police have rescued three women from a home in the neighborhood. They were held hostage for some 30 years, according to authorities.
Andy Rain EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 2:40 pm

We told you last month about a report that estimated that nearly 30 million people live in slavery worldwide.

That report by the Walk Free Foundation said that India has the most slaves (between 13.3 million and 14.7 million people), while Britain is among the countries with the fewest.

Read more

Pages