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6:23 am
Tue May 20, 2014

EU Tries A Rap Battle To Encourage Young People To Vote

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Yo, yo, listen up. I'm Renee Montagne. The European Union recently held rap battle to try to engage young voters in this week's parliamentary election, most of whom don't make it to the polls. The rap battle featured members of the Parliament amid dueling emcees like DeKay.

(SOUNDBITE OF RAP BATTLE)

DEKAY: (singing) Yeah, so make a change in how you living. If you could vote for "X Factor" why not vote for politicians?

The Two-Way
6:20 am
Tue May 20, 2014

In China, Anger At U.S. Hacking Charges — And Claims Of Hypocrisy

The building housing China's Unit 61398, a division of the army linked to hacking operations, is seen in Shanghai last year. The U.S. says the group worked to steal trade secrets from American companies.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 1:07 pm

China says U.S. charges against five Chinese military officials for allegedly hacking into American computers amount to hypocrisy, citing U.S. surveillance and wiretapping. The country's foreign ministry summoned the American ambassador Monday night to complain about the charges.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Ah, Commencement. Caps, Gowns And Mispronounced Names

For college grads all over the country, receiving their diploma can feel a lot like one of those trips to Starbucks where customers' names get mangled.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:10 pm

Last Friday on All Things Considered, NPR's Ted Robbins brought us a college commencement story the likes of which we hadn't heard before: the minefield that awaits the ceremony announcer when he or she is handed a list of students' names.

A list that said speaker must then read aloud.

In front of thousands of eager, excited, tuition-paying parents.

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Research News
6:01 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Gluten Researcher Reverses His Earlier Finding

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:43 am

A 2011 study found gluten can cause gastrointestinal distress even in people who don't suffer from celiac disease. Peter Gibson published that study, and in a new paper he says the opposite is true.

The Salt
5:59 am
Tue May 20, 2014

'Third Plate' Reimagines Farm-To-Table Eating To Nourish The Land

A view of Dan Barber's Stone Barns Center field and barns in Pocantico Hills, N.Y.
Nicole Franzen Courtesy of Blue Hill Farm

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 4:56 pm

Perched on a farm along the Hudson River is Dan Barber's award-winning restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone Barns. The food that's harvested on the farm year-round is what is served to diners daily.

But this champion of the farm-to-table movement noticed that farming and consuming foods locally still wasn't all that sustainable.

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Guilty And Charged
5:17 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Unpaid Court Fees Land The Poor In 21st Century Debtors' Prisons

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:43 am

Debtors' prisons were outlawed in the United States back before the Civil War. But an NPR state-by-state survey found that people still get sent to jail for unpaid court fines and fees.

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Europe
5:00 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Europe Steps Up Attacks Against Google

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And in Europe, Google is under increasing attack. A consortium of European digital companies has brought charges against the American Internet search giant for behaving like a monopoly. A ruling by the European Court of Justice could force Google to remove certain Web links from its search engine.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley sends this report from Paris.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (French spoken)

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Business
4:26 am
Tue May 20, 2014

St. Louis Holds Competition To Attract Startups

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Many cities are trying to attract startups. In St. Louis, the goal is to nurture the budding tech scene. To do that, the city sponsors a startup competition called Arch Grants - which awards 20 young businesses $50,000 a piece.

St. Louis Public Radio's Maria Altman reports.

MARIA ALTMAN, BYLINE: FoodEssentials has the typical startup vibe. The company gathers and organizes food label data for retailers and brands, like which products are gluten-free or are heart healthy.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHATTER)

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Latin America
4:16 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Bolivia's President Signs To Play Professional Soccer

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

In soccer-mad countries there is one job even more desirable than head of state. And now Bolivia's president has reached that goal. Evo Morales signed on to play professional soccer. The Sports Boys club has assigned him a jersey and says he will actually play. A publicity stunt, of course, but Morales has played before. In 2010, he made headlines against a team of political rivals when he kneed an opposing player in the groin.

NPR Story
4:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Military Declares Martial Law In Thailand

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In a surprise move, Thailand's army declared martial law today. For six months there's been a standoff between the government and its opposition that worsened last week after the prime minister was removed from office by Thailand's constitutional court. The Thai military says this is not a coup, insisting the move is meant to prevent violent clashes between the two sides. To learn more we're joined by reporter Michael Sullivan in Bangkok. And, Michael, the army has imposed martial law. What does Bangkok look like today?

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