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Parallels
4:31 am
Sun February 16, 2014

How Most Anyone Can Find Photos Of Secret Government Sites

A North Korean KN-08 intercontinental ballistic missile rolls past in a military parade in Pyongyang in July to mark the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice. A team of U.S. researchers recently found the buildings where the North Korean military is believed to be assembling the launchers.
David Guttenfelder AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 12:30 pm

Last August, Jeffrey Lewis saw a North Korean propaganda video, posted in April 2012, which showed its missile launchers holding intercontinental ballistic missiles, shot from an oddly-shaped building.

He was curious. So with a team of students, he modeled what the building would look like and searched for what North Korean defectors had said about the building where the missile launchers were supposedly made.

"I will admit I got a little bit obsessed with this," he says.

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The Edge
4:26 am
Sun February 16, 2014

'Sports Chaplains' Bring The Gospel To Olympic Village

International Sports Chaplain Myrna Gregory (right) uses a souvenir pin to tell a gospel story to a Russian volunteer at the Sochi Olympic Park.
Sergei Sotnikov NPR

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 9:43 pm

There are probably fewer American fans in Sochi than at previous Winter Games, partly because of concerns about security, and partly because of the time and expense it takes to get to the Russian resort town on the Black Sea.

But Americans are represented there, with gusto, by a group of evangelical Christians who call themselves the International Sports Chaplains. Members of the group have been going to the Olympic Games since 1988.

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Around the Nation
4:26 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Water-Skiing On Snow: Skijorers Aren't Just Horsing Around

A horseman pulls a skier down the street in Leadville, Colo., in March, during the city's annual skijoring event. It was the event's 62nd year.
Rick Wilking Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 10:44 am

Terri Moitozo, 52, kicks her boots into her downhill skis in Rochester, N.H. Odd thing is, she's 30 miles from any mountain.

"Combining two things I love, skiing and horses," she says. "I'm excited!

Moitozo doesn't need gravity to fly across the snow — that's what her horse, Friday, is for. That, and her buddy Nick Barishian, who's riding Friday.

"He's my horse husband," she says, pointing to Barishian. "My regular husband doesn't do the horse stuff, so you gotta hire out."

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Around the Nation
7:30 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Partial Verdict Reached In Fla. Gas Station Shooting

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:27 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

In Jacksonville, a trial that has once again thrown a spotlight on the state's Stand Your Ground law has ended with a mistrial on the main charge of murder. Michael Dunn, a 47-year-old software designer, was charged with murder and four other counts after shooting and killing 17-year-old Jordan Davis in a dispute over loud music.

NPR's Greg Allen has been following the case and joins us now. Greg, mistrial on murder, but what about the other charges?

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Technology
4:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Getting Better At Predicting The Weather

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:18 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

It has been an ugly winter. In the past two weeks, a pair of storms has made life miserable across the Eastern U.S. On Thursday, much of the south and northeast were buried in snow and ice. At least 26 people have died. Tens of thousands of flights have been canceled, rail service delayed, and roads in many cities are still impassable.

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The New And The Next
4:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Super-Secure, Temporary Texts Draw Interest Of Business Crowd

Image Source

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 12:00 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with host Arun Rath about a new texting service that promises tight security. While Snapchat has become a popular way to text photos that disappear after a number of seconds, recent hacks have raised questions about its security. A service called Privatext provides an alternative that has gained interest among some professionals.

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Middle East
4:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Life In Syria's Capital: A 'Bubble' Squeezed By Violence

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 11:10 am

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

We have an update now on the efforts to end the civil war in Syria. A second round of talks in Geneva this week ended in a stalemate. Both sides have raised questions about whether a third round will go forward at all. In homes this week, some residents were allowed to flee the city, which has been under siege for more than two years, the only tangible success from the negotiations.

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Sports
4:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

U.S. Struggles To Find Skating Groove In Sochi

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:18 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

It was another disappointing finish in speed skating for the U.S. at the Winter Olympics in Sochi. American phenom Shani Davis came in 11th place in the 1500 meter, a race for which he's won two silver medals. The focus is now shifted from the American skaters' performance to their suits.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports from Sochi.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ready.

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Around the Nation
4:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Fugitive Finally Captured: 'The Eyes Gave Her Away'

Under the name Marie Walsh, Susan LeFevre was on the lam from a Michigan prison for 32 years before being re-arrested in 2008 — also in San Diego.
AP

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:18 pm

Earlier this winter, Lt. Charles Levens from the Michigan Department of Corrections was stuck at work.

"Well, that day was a bad snow day," he says. "We were not working too much in the field. The roads were horrible, the temperatures were below zero and it was a good day to work on some cold cases."

Cooped up in his office, he pulled out an old file on a woman named Judy Lynn Hayman. She was an escapee who broke out of a Michigan prison in 1977.

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Code Switch
4:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Drive For Diversity, NASCAR's Commitment To Race

Darrell Wallace Jr., a graduate of NASCAR's Drive for Diversity Program, celebrates after winning the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Kroger 200 at Martinsville Speedway on Oct. 26 in Martinsville, Va.
Robert Laberge NASCAR via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:18 pm

On Sunday, the K&N Pro Series East begins down in New Smyrna Beach, Fla. And if the track and pit look a little more diverse than they have in the past, that's in part because of a NASCAR program designed to entice different communities to try out the sport.

Market research says NASCAR's bread-and-butter fan base is about 60 percent male and 80 percent white, mostly from the Southern and Midwestern states. But as the country continues to become even more diverse, the sport is working to make sure its fan base is, too.

That's a challenge.

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