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4:37 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Duncan Apologizes For 'Clumsy' Common Core Remarks

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 4:54 pm

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is in some hot water over remarks he made last week suggesting that opposition to Common Core of Standards was coming from "white suburban moms." He has since pulled back from those remarks.

Around the Nation
4:37 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Iconic Sheep Return To Tucson Mountains, But Is It For Good?

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 4:54 pm

The last desert bighorn sheep that roamed the mountains above Tucson, Ariz., died in the 1990s, the victim of human encroachment, mountain lions, and fire suppression. Now, the iconic Southwest animal — picture the Dodge Ram's grille — is back. A herd of 31 was released Monday morning after being transplanted over the weekend from the Yuma area in the far west of the state. Why would the sheep survive this time?

Shots - Health News
4:06 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Why College Campuses Get Hit By Meningitis Outbreaks

Six students and a visitor have fallen ill with meningitis at Princeton University in New Jersey, shown here in August 2013. All have recovered or are recovering, officials said.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

For the past nine months, Princeton University in New Jersey has been trying to halt an outbreak of bacterial meningitis in its students without success. So it's going to offer students a vaccine that's not yet approved for broader use in the US.

Since bacterial meningitis is a serious infection of the brain and spinal cord that can cause brain damage and death, having it on campus is no small matter.

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NPR Story
4:03 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Pat Conroy No Longer Hides Behind Fiction To Tell His Family's Stories

Pat Conroy is author of "The Death of Santini." (Jennifer Hitchcock)

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 5:31 pm

Pat Conroy’s troubled family history has been the wellspring of many of his novels, including “The Great Santini” and “The Prince of Tides.”

As he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, “No writer has been imprisoned by his family like I have, in the history of American letters. I have been writing about this family for 40 years.”

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NPR Story
4:03 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Facebook Helps Reunite Tornado Victims With Lost Mementos

Photo found in Seneca, IL. (From the Facebook page "PHOTOS found from Nov 17, 2013 Illinois Storms/Tornadoes")

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 5:31 pm

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NPR Story
4:03 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Cleanup Continues Across Midwest After Devastating Tornadoes

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 5:31 pm

Dozens of tornadoes struck the Midwest on Sunday, leaving hundreds of homes damaged or destroyed. Now starts the long cleanup process, as families sift through the debris of what used to be their homes.

The American Red Cross and other aid groups are moving in, to provide shelters for displaced residents. NPR’s David Schaper joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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Classical Music
3:28 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Act Like You Know: Benjamin Britten

A portrait of the composer Benjamin Britten from 1948.
Denis De Marney Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 11:57 am

British composer Benjamin Britten was born 100 years ago this Friday, Nov. 22. Before you ask "Benja-who?" consider this: Did you see Wes Anderson's film Moonrise Kingdom last summer, or Pedro Almodovar's Talk to Her back a decade or so ago? (Well, maybe you have to be an art-house denizen for those.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Researchers Find Ancient Seawater Had Twice The Salt

A map showing the impact areas of a large asteroid or comet that struck the Chesapeake Bay some 35 million years ago.
U.S. Geological Survey

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 5:57 pm

Scientists have discovered a pocket of ancient seawater that's been trapped underground near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay since the time of the dinosaurs — strong evidence that the Atlantic Ocean was once much saltier than today.

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The Two-Way
2:25 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Beyond The Caricature: 5 Things To Know About Mayor Rob Ford

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford leaves his office after councilors passed motions Monday to limit his powers.
Chris Young The Canadian Press

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:50 pm

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford was thrust into the international spotlight after he admitted to smoking crack. Since then, a caricature of the politician has emerged: a bumbling, error-prone addict, whose everyman persona has helped him maintain his popularity in Canada's most populous city.

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Author Interviews
2:24 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Anjelica Huston Tells Her 'Story' Of Growing Up With A Director Dad

In a new memoir, Anjelica Huston recounts her childhood in Ireland, her teen years in London and her coming of age in New York.
Robert Fleischauer Courtesy of Scribner

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 1:40 pm

Anjelica Huston is best-known for her performances in Prizzi's Honor, The Grifters, The Addams Family, The Royal Tenenbaums and the TV series Smash. But her new memoir about her early life, A Story Lately Told, ends just as her successful acting career begins. That part of her life will be in a second volume, now in the works.

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