Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Police in Jupiter, Fla. have charged Donald Trump's campaign manager with battery for allegedly grabbing a reporter for Breitbart news following a Trump campaign rally earlier this month.

Corey Lewandowski is charged with one count of simple battery.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has endorsed Ted Cruz ahead of the state's presidential primary next week.

Walker, a former leading presidential candidate, called Cruz a constitutional conservative who can win in the fall.

"I just fundamentally believe if you look at the facts, if you look at the numbers, that Ted Cruz is the best-positioned by far to both win the nomination of the Republican Party and to then go on and defeat Hillary Clinton in the fall this year," Walker said Tuesday morning on WTMJ radio in Milwaukee.

Donald Trump has set his sights on a new target for litigation: the Republican Party. He is threatening to sue the Republican National Committee over delegate allocations in Louisiana. Trump defeated Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in Louisiana's March 5 primary, but Cruz may receive up to 10 more delegates from the state than Trump.

Trump defeated Cruz by 3.6 percentage points in Louisiana. But because the results were relatively close, each candidate was awarded 18 delegates.

Donald Trump has said on several occasions that he wants to, as he puts it, "open up" libel laws, so that he can sue news organizations he believes have written what he calls "hit pieces."

Libel laws now make it extremely difficult for public figures to sue for damages. Still, a President Trump would very likely have a hard time changing them.

When President Obama heads to Havana later this month he is expected to take in a baseball game featuring the Cuban national team against the visiting Tampa Bay Rays. Cuba has long been a hotbed of the sport and more than a dozen Cuban-born players are now on major league rosters. That number could grow by a lot and soon, if Major League Baseball has its way.

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