Camille Phillips

Education Reporter

Camille Phillips covers education for Texas Public Radio.

She previously worked at St. Louis Public Radio, where she reported on the racial unrest in Ferguson, the impact of the opioid crisis and, most recently, education.

Camille was part of the news team that won a national Edward R. Murrow and a Peabody Award for One Year in Ferguson, a multi-media reporting project. She also won a regional Murrow for contributing to St. Louis Public Radio’s continuing coverage on the winter floods of 2016.

Her work has aired on NPR’s "Morning Edition" and national newscasts, as well as public radio stations in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Camille grew up in southwest Missouri and moved to New York City after college. She taught middle school Spanish in the Bronx before beginning her journalism career.

She has an undergraduate degree from Truman State University and a master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Ways to Connect

UIW medical student Edwin Davila talks to a Southside ISD student at a family orientation in the fall of 2017.
Provided | Southside ISD

A few weeks into their first semester at University of the Incarnate Word’s School of Osteopathic Medicine, the 162 students in UIW’s inaugural class were paired up with 27 families from the Southside Independent School District.

For the next two years, the medical students will visit or call the parents, grandparents and students every two weeks. The goal is to help the families improve their health in a part of the region that has some of the worst health outcomes in San Antonio.


Pregnancy test
Johannes Jander via Flickr

San Antonio has cut the rate of teen births in half over the past decade, but the city’s rate is still almost 50 percent higher than the national rate, according to a new report from the city’s Metropolitan Health District.

Pixabay CC0 http://bit.ly/2n0vH0h

For more than 20 years, Communities in Schools of San Antonio has operated a federally-funded program called Upward Bound at South San Antonio High School. Upward Bound’s aim is to help prepare students from low-income families for college and support them once they’re there.

But this summer Communities in Schools received bad news: The U.S. Department of Education would not be renewing the five year, $400,000 grant that supported the program.

When a majority of a school's students qualify for free-or-reduced-price lunch, districts can offer free meals to all.
“School Lunch 1” by Delaware Agriculture is licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Harlandale and San Antonio independent school districts are among the best in the state at making sure their students have enough to eat, according to new research from the nonprofit advocacy group Children at Risk.

Judson ISD Police Chief Teresa Ramon takes one of the helmets out of the closet in her office, where she also keeps bulletproof vests.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The Sutherland Springs church shooting was a stark reminder that threats can happen anywhere, but San Antonio school officials say they have layers of protections in place already, starting with regular lockdown drills for students and teachers.


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