David Brown

David D. Brown is executive producer and host of the award-winning cultural journalism program Texas Music Matters at NPR affiliate KUT-FM in Austin. He is former anchor of the award-winning public radio business program Marketplace, and a veteran public radio journalist. He has reported national and international affairs for Monitor Radio from bases in Atlanta, Boston, London, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.

Brown is currently completing his Ph.D. in Journalism at The University of Texas in Austin, and has been an active member of the California Bar since 2000.

From Texas Standard:

When Mack Brown stepped down as head coach of the Texas Longhorns football team, he was the second winningest in school history with a national title under his belt. We all know that Mack Brown, but there’s another one — the off-the-field tactician who recruits for nonprofits.

Land of the free and the home of the hacker?  Why Texas ranks top for e-fraudsters.  Also, echoes of the D.C. sniper attacks with random shootings in Houston. Plus, Andy Roddick speaks out on Texas Education and – unlike some other sports heroes – still refuses to bite his tongue. All that and more on this episode of the Texas Standard.

Ronald Ali-Khan / Wikimedia

Texas music legend Steve Earle was raised in San Antonio but doesn’t want to live in Texas again.

UT’s first black quarterback was Donnie Little. 

“It’s more prevalent now in the last 10 years. You see more black quarterbacks in the NFL, all over. It wasn’t like that when I came through,” Little says.

Little sort of dismisses the racism he faced. He talks about it in a special Longhorn Network program in recognition of Black History Month.

As the courts brace for battle over halting deportations, where’s the outrage over the other unilateral immigration action? Plus, the Texas tax cuts of 2015 — will they happen, who’ll keep their money and why? Also, youngsters step up to school the rest of us on the trouble with coeducation in Texas. And after the thaw, tips on getting your hands dirty. All that and more on the Texas Standard.

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