Eileen Pace

Morning Edition Host

Eileen Pace is a veteran radio and print journalist with a long history of investigative and feature reporting in San Antonio and Houston, earning more than 50 awards for investigative reporting, documentaries, long-form series,  features, sports stories, outstanding anchoring and best use of sound.

Eileen has reported and anchored KIKK AM-FM Houston, WOAI NewsRadio San Antonio, and KLBJ-AM in Austin and served as news director at KGNB-KNBT in New Braunfels, Texas. She was WOAI's first female news anchor, anchoring with Bob Guthrie during morning drive for a decade. She joined the news department at Texas Public Radio in 2010. Eileen has provided stories for CBS, ABC, NBC, Fox Radio, Reuters, and the Associated Press, as well as the BBC, KUHF-Houston, the San Antonio Express-News, the San Antonio Business Journal, SA Local News and Edible San Antonio and has served as an on-camera volunteer for KUHT-TV/Houston and KLRN-TV/San Antonio. 

Eileen is TPR's military, environment, county government and business reporter. She also enjoys covering Hemisfair, health, historic preservation and human interest stories. In 2011, Eileen's five-part series on the transition of Kelly Air Force Base after BRAC won the Edward R. Murrow Regional Award and a statewide award from the Associated Press. She earned a first-place statewide Lone Star Award from the Houston Press Club for her program on Black History Month on "The Source" in 2012. In 2013, Eileen produced another long-form series that examined the plight of refugees that come to San Antonio from all over the world. 

Eileen graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from UTSA, where she also studied business administration and architecture. She enjoys travel, being a dog foster mom, writing and spending time with her children and grandchildren.

Her awards include:

National Headliners Club Awards, Katie Awards from the Dallas Press Club, the Lone Star Award from the Houston Press Club, the Regional Edward R. Murrow Award, an award from the Texas Medical Association, and numerous awards from the Associated Press, the Society of Professional Journalists, Texas State Network, and the State Bar of Texas.

Ways To Connect

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

There was a flurry of social media posts on Friday by people concerned that their favorite beer was losing its popular logo. But a lawsuit settled this week means that Alamo Beer gets to keep the famous facade on its label.

On the surface, it seems like a complicated legal entanglement, but it really boils down to one simple statement from the General Land Office: “Alamo Brewing Company is the first commercial recipient of an official license to use the Alamo mark, for which they paid a substantial licensing fee.”

Alamo Beer CEO Eugene Simor says it’s been almost a year since his company filed a lawsuit to get another company, the Texian Brewing Company, to stop using the Alamo on its beer labels.

Simor says three days after his filing, the Texas General Land Office took notice and filed as an intervenor.

San Antonio River Authority

The San Antonio River Authority said it could take weeks to clean up Fiesta trash that made its way into the river after the festival was over.

Heavy downpours during and after the two-week party has left an unusually large amount of garbage along a stretch of the river bank. 

But SARA’s Steven Schauer said the trash in the river isn’t just related to Fiesta.

Joey Palacios

The second annual “Big Give S.A.” is a week away, and San Antonio non-profits are working to build momentum ahead of the big day on May 5.

Scott McAninch, Executive Director of the San Antonio Non-Profit Council, says the Big Give brings scores of local organizations together -- and demonstrates to communities how much they rely on and benefit from non-profit organizations.

Courtesy SAISD

The San Antonio Independent School District is preparing to make an offer to one of two finalists for the job as the new superintendent.

The SAISD Board of Trustees announced at its April 13 meeting that it had narrowed the field to two candidates: Pedro Martinez, Superintendent in Residence for the Nevada Dept. of Education; and Dr. Scott Muri, Deputy Superintendent of Academics for Fulton County Schools in Atlanta.

Martinez and Muri were to come back this week, each to have a one-day series of information meetings with stakeholders. 

But Board President Ed Garza told reporters Tuesday he had received a letter from Muri  saying he had been selected as a finalist in another district and asked that his name be withdrawn from the process. The Wednesday night information meeting with Muri was canceled. 

“This was an aggressive and thorough search process that started with more than 40 possible candidates,” said Garza.

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base." This is the last of four reports this week about the National Guard.

It was December 2007 and Darryl Davidson was driving down a busy San Antonio street when something flew off the truck in front of him. He thinks it might have been a car battery, but he still isn't sure.

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