Jan Ross Piedad

Assistant Producer & Texas Station Collaborative Coordinator

Raised in San Antonio, Jan Ross is a graduate of UT Austin’s School of Journalism. Before starting at Texas Public Radio, she interned for the News Desk at NPR Headquarters and the network’s mid-day program, Here & Now. She was a member of Texas Standard’s digital-first web team and interned during the newsmagazine show’s launch in 2015. Jan Ross is a Salzburg Academy on Media & Global Change Fellow and was selected for the University of Texas System’s Archer Fellowship in Washington, D.C.  

Jan Ross is interested in all things pop culture and global affairs. Her journalistic interests range from issues of social inequality to media commentary. She enjoys travel, podcasts, live music, and sharing the best of film and television. 

 

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Public Domain / Pixabay

The Bexar County District Attorney and Sheriff's offices are working with the San Antonio Police Department to implement a method known as "cite and release" for select misdemeanors. 

Public Domain / Pixabay

At least 1 million of the nation's 8 million minority-owned firms are based in Texas, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Pixabay

The results of the 2016 presidential election prompted many Americans to question the electoral college – a winner-takes-all system which empowers a group of 538 electors to name the next president of the United States.

Courtesy MOVE San Antonio

A state voter registration law enacted 34 years ago by the Texas legislature is seeing scant results, largely due to low participation by the same institutions the policy aims to target: high schools.    

The little-known law addresses voter registration for eligible students – teens at least 17 years and 10 months old – and requires Texas high school principals or designees to provide voter registration information at least twice a year.

According to the Texas Civil Rights Project, six percent of high schools asked the Texas Secretary of State's office for voter registration applications in 2016. Only 198 of the state's 1,428 public high schools indicated that they requested forms, while none of the estimated 1,800 private schools across the state reported making the same request.

"Participation in our High School Voter Registration Initiative is crucial to the future of our state and the health of our democracy," Secretary of State Rolando Pablos said in a statement. "I welcome any valid input from community stakeholders and seek to work with organizations whose priorities are educating students on their civic duties and empowering them to vote, rather than engaging in misplaced political campaigns."

Public Domain / Pixabay

How do nations take back control during turbulent times? 2016 carried at least two key turns in the global tide, each with profound consequences already evident in today's political climate. 


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