Joey Palacios

News Reporter

Born and raised in San Antonio, Joey joined the Texas Public Radio newsroom in October of 2011. Joey graduated from Roosevelt High School and obtained an A.A.S in Radio-Television-Broadcasting from San Antonio College in 2010.

Joey started his broadcasting career  in 2007 at KSYM-90.1 FM as a DJ and later became Program Director of the station. After graduation, he interned at  KTSA-550 AM and was hired as a reporter covering elections, breaking news, and the 2011 legislative session.

For TPR, Joey covers a variety of general assignments including: breaking news, local school districts, higher education, police, fire, capital improvement, non-profits, health care, community issues and local politics. Joey has also had several stories aired on NPR national newscasts.

When not working, Joey enjoys biking, hiking, cooking, and socializing.

Ways To Connect

San Antonio Water System

The San Antonio Water System has issued a record number of landscaping coupons to customers wanting to lower yard water usage.

When SAWS first debuted its Watersaver Landscape Coupon program in 2013, there were about 4,000 applicants. Karen Guz, the Director of Conservation at SAWS, says the number “shocked us, honestly. we didn’t think we’d have that high of participation.”

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

  There was plenty to celebrate at Lake Medina this holiday weekend, as the crowds returned in full force with the end of the drought that has plagued the area these past few years.

Three months ago, you wouldn’t have heard these sounds of laughter here, with the lake only three percent full. Thanks to the wettest May on record and a pretty rainy June, it’s now 73 percent full.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The debate over flying the Confederate flag has moved to a private cemetery near certain African-American neighborhoods in San Antonio. The Confederate Cemetery on the city’s Eastside is the burial site for hundreds of soldiers who fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War and the debate is over whether the cemetery flag should come down. 

Joey Palacios

More than two dozen couples lined up to say “I do” at the Bexar County Clerk’s Office Friday, as the U.S. Supreme Court struck down gay marriage bans across the country.  

Shortly after the Supreme Court ruling, the Clerk’s Office sprung into action. Deputy Clerk Thomas Koening left his office to get an opinion from District Attorney Nice LaHood. “We’re going to see what happens legally once it’s interpreted by the DA; then we’ll have an answer for you,” Koening said, as he rushed into an elevator.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The Bexar County Clerk says he’s ready for a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that would lift the Texas ban on same-sex marriage. The ruling could come as early as Monday morning. If that happens, Bexar County is 

ready to immediately grant marriage licenses and speed-up the matrimonial process for couples. 

Bexar County Clerk Gerry Rickhoff has been in office about 20 years. He generally presides over the process of granting marriage licenses for heterosexual couples four or five times a week. Rickhoff is now prepared to do the same thing for same-sex couples, if the Supreme Court rules Texas and other states must grant marriage licenses.

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