Joey Palacios

News Reporter

Born and raised in San Antonio, Joey joined the Texas Public Radio newsroom in October of 2011. Joey graduated from Roosevelt High School and obtained an A.A.S in Radio-Television-Broadcasting from San Antonio College in 2010.

Joey started his broadcasting career  in 2007 at KSYM-90.1 FM as a DJ and later became Program Director of the station. After graduation, he interned at  KTSA-550 AM and was hired as a reporter covering elections, breaking news, and the 2011 legislative session.

For TPR, Joey covers a variety of general assignments including: breaking news, local school districts, higher education, police, fire, capital improvement, non-profits, health care, community issues and local politics. Joey has also had several stories aired on NPR national newscasts.

When not working, Joey enjoys biking, hiking, cooking, and socializing.

Ways to Connect

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

On Fronteras:  Brownsville Zika Case, Police Diversity Training, Breaking Bread With Refugees

·         This week on Fronteras:   

·         A Brownsville woman contracts Zika locally - that steps up mosquito testing and killing.

·         Nine of 10 teachers report the election has had a negative effect on students.

·         How diversity training gives police vital cultural information for their encounters with Latinos, African Americans and immigrants.

·         The U.S. charter school model is going global in Pakistan to improve student achievement.

·         The powerful effect of breaking bread with refugees.

Texas Public Radio

Plans unveiled on Wednesday for developing around the Alamo include the possibility of closing Alamo Street in front of the historic mission.  Planners also suggest moving the sacred Cenotaph monument.

The Swedish furniture store IKEA is announcing plans to build a new store in the San Antonio suburb of Live Oak. The company says it felt it was time to move into San Antonio area.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Colleagues, friends and family described Detective Benjamin Marconi as "a rock," someone "imperfectly perfect," and a man who believed in always giving others a second chance.

He was kind and a good role model with the ability to put people at ease. From Monday's service, it was clear he was dearly loved by his children, respected by his colleagues and trusted by the community. 


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio police have a man in custody who they believe shot and killed Detective Benjamin Marconi on Sunday.  The suspect told reporters he was angry about a child-custody battle and "lashed out at somebody who didn't deserve it."
 

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