Nathan Cone

Director of Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Creative Commons

This year, Texas Public Radio is promoting the idea of open, engaged listening as a way to change the tenor of our times. The campaign is called Dare To Listen, and you can learn more about it online at http://idaretolisten.org and “take the dare” while you’re there. Many people have already done so, and one of the first questions they ask us is “Well, what now? What do I do next?”

Mary Keating Bruton

Terri Hendrix is from San Antonio, and got her start playing everywhere from "greasy dives" (as she once told me) to fancier digs like Restaurant Biga back when it was off of McCullough St. In 1996, she released her first album, "Two Dollar Shoes." The infectious title track and folksy melodies were a hit. She kept writing and performing, and became a self-made businesswoman with the establishment of her own record label, Wilory Records (née Tycoon Cowgirl Records).  Twenty years and over a dozen studio/live releases later, her audience has grown into a nationwide following.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Even when Terri Hendrix gets the blues, she does so with joy and passion. Her latest album, “Love You Strong,” was released earlier this year after a five-year hiatus from recording.

Albany Records

Every now and then I drop a new classical release in the player and find myself instantly delighted by new music.

Decca/UMG

I can think of many reasons to see “Florence Foster Jenkins,” the new biographical comedy starring Meryl Streep as the titular socialite who fancied herself an operatic soprano, even though she couldn’t carry a tune. But after listening to the soundtrack to the film, I cannot think of any reason to revisit it a second time.

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