Nathan Cone

Director of Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways To Connect

© Ben Thorn

Mary Cutrufello knows just how much people in Texas like to dance. Before she relocated to Minnesota in the early 2000s, she spent ten years touring, creating, and learning the music of Texas. In the summer of 1997, she played live at the Cibolo Creek Country Club for TPR’s “Sunday Night Session,” which was broadcast on KSTX 89.1 FM from 1996-2010. [You can hear the full show at the bottom of the page]

Nathan Cone

Guitarist Ted Martinez works alone, but it wasn’t always supposed to be that way. Originally, he planned to work with a musical partner, hence his now alter-ego name, “This Is Where Two Oceans Meet.” Things didn’t work out that way, and now Martinez creates multi-layered soundscapes using a variety of electronic looping devices, pedals, and percussion. The effect is like hearing up to three or four people perform at once.

“I have a reliable band partner now,” Martinez jokes.

In between the Bach, Elgar, and Aaron Copland, Youth Orchestras of San Antonio (YOSA) occasionally finds time to perform arrangements of popular songs. You can see some of their videos on YouTube.

Page Graham / YOSA

A sold-out crowd enjoyed YOSA (Youth Orchestras of San Antonio) on May 17, 2015 at the Tobin Center for a massive performance of Carl Orff's "scenic cantata," Carmina Burana. San Antonio's premier youth orchestra was joined by the Children's Chorus of San Antonio, the UIW Cardinal Chorale, the San Antonio Choral Society, and solosits Jamie-Rose Guarrine, Ryland Angel, and Zachary Gordin. 

You can see video of the performance below:

Deutsche Grammophon/Universal Music

It’s 2015. Keith Moon and John Entwistle are dead, and the guy who wrote “hope I die before I get old” has gone and arranged Quadrophenia for tenor and orchestra. What are we to make of this? To be honest, the first thing I wondered when I dropped Pete Townshend’s Classic Quadrophenia into the CD player was whether the thing would suck.