Nathan Cone

VP, Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media. His reporting and criticism has been honored by the Houston Press Club and Texas Associated Press.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

For Doc Watkins, playing in a trio vs. the big band he runs brings a unique set of challenges and opportunities.

“With the piano trio, there's a vast palette of colors that you can try and capture with the sounds of brushes or sticks on the drums, or floor toms, or "arco" on the bass (with a bow) to the way that you harmonize a melody, to the way that the melody is presented in the first place. I feel as a trio we're just getting to the point where we really are wanting to step out and try and explore all the possibilities of that particular format.”

FineTunerz

With its “biggest small town” feel that locals have recognized for years, San Antonio is a great place for fostering young talent because of its positivity, according to pianist Daniel Anastasio. He grew up here, performing with the junior Tuesday Musical Club, YOSA, the Olmos Ensemble, and other musical groups, before settling in New York for a career as a concert pianist.

Water quality was at the top of everyone’s mind at the eighth annual Water Forum sponsored by San Antonio Clean Technology Forum. Even before opening the program, several speakers cited the quality of San Antonio’s water. Andrew Sansom, who was awarded the Water for Life award for his work with the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, among other achievements, noted in accepting the award, “San Antonio a beacon of hope for the rest of the United States with respect to water.”

Courtesy photo

A few minutes with Sammy Miller & The Congregation, and you may start musing on the Duke Ellington title that closes out this show: “Things Ain’t What They Used To Be.” In this case, it’s because Miller and his band bring an infectious, joyous stage show as part of their sets, including bits of comedy and theatrical performance.

Justin De Hoyos

Although he grew up in a bilingual household, Adrian Ruiz didn’t hear a lick of English-language music until he was 11 years old. Growing up, it was all conjunto and horn-based music on radio station KEDA, or music from his uncle, an ace on the accordion, or the beautiful voice of his great-grandmother. When he finally joined the band in school, Ruiz jokes the band director gave him three choices: trumpet, trumpet, or trumpet.

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