Nathan Cone

Director of Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Nathan Cone / TPR

Pro sports in San Antonio was the main topic of a panel discussion hosted by District 8 City Councilman Ron Nirenberg at Hills & Dales Ice House on the Northwest Side, held on Tuesday, April 26.

Representatives from the San Antonio Missions, the City of San Antonio, the University of Texas at San Antonio, and the nonprofit San Antonio Sports all weighed in on the city’s present flirtation with luring a Triple-A baseball team, as well as future dreams such as a Major League Soccer team or an NFL franchise.

StoryCorps

"I heard somebody say, 'Terrorists, go back to your home. You don't belong here.'"

Sarwat Husain came to America with her husband from Pakistan. She’s Muslim, but she didn’t always wear a hijab, the traditional head scarf donned by Muslim women outside the home. After 9/11, she gave it a try, and experienced a very different reality than the one she had previously known. "Now I knew that something had to be done," she remembers. Husain reaches out to all faiths and works to educate the public about Islam.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Local and state leaders in education met at the Pearl Stable in San Antonio on Thursday, April 21 for a forum on educational initiatives, issues and the quest for student success in the San Antonio area. The sold-out event was hosted by the San Antonio Area Foundation and the San Antonio Clean Technology Forum.

Lennon Maldonado / TPR

Elizabeth Cave is sure of herself, even if she isn’t sure where her music fits in. “People tell me ‘you should try to play clubs, you should go to these open mic nights,’ but I don’t necessarily know if that’s where this music is meant to be [heard],” says Cave.

As Cave explains, her songs, which often address themes of social justice, come from deeply Christian roots.

StoryCorps

“What do you mean, ‘it’s not in the grooves’?” Vikki Carr remembers asking her record label, incredulously, after they balked at releasing the song “It Must Be Him” as a single.

“How could a guy sitting behind a desk know that [the song] wasn’t going to make it? I was the one dealing with the audience,” Carr says, noting the standing ovations she got every night in the 1960s.

Carr continues, “There are things in your heart you have to fight for.”

Sure enough, “It Must Be Him” became a number 3 pop hit and number one easy listening hit in 1967.

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