Nathan Cone

Director of Cultural & Community Engagement

Nathan has been with the organization since 1995.  He leads the organization's cultural and community engagement outreach and social media efforts. Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. He worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Community Engagement, Marketing, and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially Disney movies and those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

Ways to Connect

Nathan Cone / TPR

The video below was taken at 8:30 a.m. on October 1, 2015, traveling east to west. It begins near the Martinez Tire Shop at O’Connor and IH-35 and ends in the parking lot of the H-E-B at IH-10 and Wurzbach. It took about 20 minutes to drive the route, and as you can see, traffic starts to back up as soon as the Parkway ends at NW Military Drive! Luckily, we hit some green lights traveling east through Lockhill-Selma and Vance Jackson. 

Earlier this year it looked like Opera San Antonio, the 2009 start-up company that won a residency at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, was in trouble. In February the company announced that its high-profile artistic director, composer Tobias Picker, was leaving. Its first season at the Tobin was well-attended, but the cost of three brand-new productions, two of which were staged in the smaller Alvarez Theater, was taking its toll.

Nathan Cone

On Thursday, September 17, Santikos Theatres introduces a new technology to San Antonio moviegoers that promises to place the viewer in the middle of the experience. It’s called Barco Escape, and it’s a little like the old Cinerama, but digitally achieved without a curved screen.

Talking to members of the San Antonio six-piece band fishermen, it’s clear the guys aren’t fooling around. Of all the groups that came to our studios this summer for our “Back 40” live music project, they’re the only ones that brought their manager along. That they even have a manager is also telling.

“When did we not need a manager?” jokes bass player Roy Scavone.

©Disney

On my DVD shelf at home I have two volumes of Tom & Jerry cartoons, three sets of Looney Tunes, four packs of Donald Duck shorts, Mickey Mouse, Goofy, and Woody Woodpecker, not to mention various rarities from the Disney archives that have been released over the years. Most of the short films on those DVDs span the Golden Age of Animation, ushered in by Mickey Mouse in 1928 and lasting until roughly the 1960s, when television became a more lucrative option for producing animated shorts than theatrical distribution.

Pages