Nathan Cone

Director of Marketing & Community Engagement

Texas Public Radio’s Director of Marketing and Community Engagement has been with the organization since 1995.  Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. Since then he has worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Marketing and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

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10:18 pm
Fri December 14, 2012

Philip Glass and the "Qatsi" Trilogy

Lead in text: 
Godfrey Reggio's groundbreaking trilogy of experimental films, "Koyaanisqatsi" (1983), "Powaaqatsi" (1988), and "Naqoyqatsi" (2002), were released for the first time on Blu-ray this month from the Criterion Collection. In this essay, former New York Times arts critic John Rockwell traces the evolution of Philip Glass's music, and how it works in these wordless films.
The Qatsi Trilogy: Counterpoint and Harmony By John Rockwell At this late date, with Glass having attained the patriarchal age of seventy-five, some of the polemics about minimalism have abated. He's still in some ways boyish, but he is also a father figure for generations of younger composers, some of whose music sounds in no way like his own.
TPR Cinema
10:55 pm
Sat December 8, 2012

Soundtrack/Movie Review: "Hitchcock"

Alfred Hitchock was one of the greatest filmmakers of the 20th century, but he also had a dark side. A deeper reading of his films reveals some of Hitch’s hidden obsessions, including: murder, sex, and love. Throughout his career, Hitchcock was aided by the unseen hand of his wife, Alma Reville, who often served as the director’s sounding board and sometime editor.

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TPR Cinema
11:21 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Soundtrack Review: "Anna Karenina"

Decca Records

Leo Tolstoy’s novel “Anna Karenina” continues to be a source of inspiration for filmmakers, having been adapted over a dozen times in different forms by directors all over the world. Joe Wright’s feature film boldly breaks from tradition, confining most of the plot on a single soundstage.

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Arts & Culture
3:30 pm
Thu November 22, 2012

Soundtrack Review: "Lincoln"

Credit Sony Music Entertainment

Steven Spielberg and composer John Williams’s long and fruitful collaboration continues with “Lincoln.”  The prolific Williams draws upon folk styles to create an impression of America’s 16th president.

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TPR Cinema
1:57 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Interview: Author J.B. Kaufman on "The Fairest One of All"

Weldon Owen (publisher)

“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” may not have been the first animated film, but as author and film historian J.B. Kaufman points out, Walt Disney “completely redefined the concept of what an animated feature could be” with his 1937 film, celebrating 75 years this December.

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10:09 am
Fri November 16, 2012

John Williams Tops Poll of Best Film Composers

Lead in text: 
The showbiz trade Variety recently polled 40 composers active in the movie industry, asking for their top three film scores of all time. John Williams came out on top with the most mentions, while Ennio Morricone's score for "The Mission" was ranked as Best Score overall. Read the entire article after the jump.
Ennio Morricone's original music for Roland Joffe's 1986 film "The Mission" landed on top of a Variety poll of 40 active composers who were asked to name their top three original movie scores of all time in order of preference.
KPAC Blog
10:11 pm
Wed November 7, 2012

KPAC's 30th Anniversary: 30 Great Film Scores

Olivia Wilde, lounging and listening to some awesome soundtracks.
Credit ©Disney. All Rights Reserved.

This month, KPAC is celebrating thirty years of broadcasting. Our hosts are having some fun sharing "30 lists" - artists, music, movies, and recordings you might enjoy, that help shape the sound of your classical oasis.

As the curator of Texas Public Radio’s film series, Cinema Tuesdays, I spend a lot of my free time enjoying movies, and their soundtracks.  Soundtracks make up a small but important section of our library at KPAC. Because we connect to movies on such a personal level, film scores often come with built-in emotional attachment. Below is a list of some of my favorites. While this is by no means a ‘best of’ list, these are the records I enjoy spinning most often on my CD player and iPod. I created a Spotify list, linked below, so you can listen to all of the tracks in a playlist, and in the article, each track is linked to Amazon when available so you can download a song or album for yourself. Have fun listening!

Click here to listen to the list on Spotify.

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TPR Cinema
12:38 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

TPR Cinema Profile: Taylor James Johnson and Dylan Cody Altman

Taylor James Johnson (left) and Dylan Cody Altman (right).
Nathan Cone

Throwing spaghetti against the wall may be a good metaphor for San Antonio filmmakers Taylor James Johnson and Dylan Cody Altman.  The act itself would likely find a welcome home in one of the duo’s short films, which often take the form of pop culture parodies, full of outrageous behavior.  Whether it’s a mash-up of “Taken” and Stephen Spielberg’s “Hook,” or lending a hand as an actor in a fellow filmmaker’s sci-fi genre film, the camera loves Johnson, and he loves working with the camera. And the duo are prolific, releasing over a dozen films online this year so far. 

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Arts & Culture
1:00 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

Full Metal Jacket: A War Movie for the Warriors

Credit Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

Stanley Kubrick’s “Full Metal Jacket” has earned its share of praise and hand-wringing since its debut 25 years ago. It’s been called the least of Kubrick’s war films, and has often been dismissed as a two-act movie that falls apart halfway through.

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Crime
10:15 am
Fri August 17, 2012

The Private Eye That Exposed "The Imposter"

In the summer of 1994, 13-year-old Nicholas Barclay was reported missing from his home on the near northeast side of San Antonio. You can imagine the shock his mother Beverly and half-sister Carey felt when they learned that he had been found three years later—in Spain. However, the young man who came back to Texas and lived with the family for nearly five months was not Nicholas, but serial child imposter Frédéric Bourdin. 

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